Later On

A blog written for those whose interests more or less match mine.

Archive for the ‘Drug laws’ Category

Two videos showing lack of control and accountability for prosecutors

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Radley Balko writes in the Washington Post:

The first is from Anthony Fischer at Reason.tv. It includes just about every drug war excess imaginable, including a militarized police raid for a nonviolent crime, vaguely written drug laws, prosecutorial misconduct, the coercive use of bond, abuse of conspiracy charges, abuse of the plea bargain and the intimidation of media and witnesses to duck transparency.

The second video is from the conservative criminal justice reform group Right on Crime. It’s about prosecutorial discretion and the criminalization of environmental law. The couple in the video were forbidden from building on a parcel of land they had purchased when, after they had purchased it, it was designated a “wetland,” apparently because a backed-up drainage system had caused some standing water . . .

Continue reading.

You know, regarding the first video, I’ve seen police aggression exactly like this in movies, but generally it’s Cold War East German movies, or Soviet-spy thrillers set in Moscow: such police actions and tactics were viewed as a sign of a bad government, a government that was starting to oppress its citizens. It’s a pretty familiar pattern, and I’m sorry to see it underway in the US.

Another example, from a NY Times article by Jim Dwyer today:

. . . When Bill de Blasio was running for mayor last year, he noted that marijuana arrests, which fall most heavily on black and Latino males, “have disastrous consequences,” and pledged to curtail the practice of ratcheting up what should be a minor violation of the law into a misdemeanor.

This week, a report showed that such arrests were continuing at about the same pace as last year; the de Blasio mayoralty had not appreciably changed the number of such cases. The Legal Aid Society has a roster of clients across the city who face misdemeanor charges for possession of minuscule amounts of pot because, it was charged, they were “openly displaying” it. About 75 percent of those charged had no prior criminal convictions, and more than 80 percent were black or Latino, according to the report, from the Marijuana Arrest Research Project and the Drug Policy Alliance. . .

Think about it: the NYPD no longer heeds the mayor. The NYPD is an independent entity with no controlling authority—well, no authority that can in fact exert control.

Police departments in this country are starting to seem like military emplacements to control the citizenry—at least in places (cf. Ferguson MO).

And the above raid was done with the support and participation of Federal law enforcement. It’s a little too Kristallnachtish for my taste. If you say, “Well, that’s only one case” (or three, depending on how you count), I would point out that each case is only one case—and moreover, don’t we want to take vigorous action to nip this kind of police work in the bud?

Written by LeisureGuy

22 October 2014 at 2:46 pm

Laws have consequences—cf. drug laws that have created the opium trade in Afghanistan

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Ryan Devereaux reports in The Intercept:

A new report has found the war on drugs in Afghanistan remains colossally expensive, largely ineffective and likely to get worse. This is particularly true in the case of opium production, says the U.S. Office of the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction.

In a damning report released Tuesday, the special inspector general, Justin F. Sopko, writes that “despite spending over $7 billion to combat opium poppy cultivation and to develop the Afghan government’s counternarcotics capacity, opium poppy cultivation levels in Afghanistan hit an all-time high in 2013,” hitting 209,000 hectares, surpassing the prior, 2007 peak of 193,000 hectares. Sopko adds that the number should continue to rise thanks to deteriorating security in rural Afghanistan and weak eradication efforts.

Though the figures it reports are jarring, the inspector general’s investigation highlights drug policy failures in Afghanistan that have been consistently documented for years. Indeed, Sopko himself has been raising concerns over the failing drug war in Afghanistan for some time. In January, he testified before the Senate Caucus on International Narcotics Control and described a series of discouraging conversations with counternarcotics officials from Afghanistan, the U.S., and elsewhere.

“In the opinion of almost everyone I spoke with, the situation in Afghanistan is dire with little prospect for improvement in 2014 or beyond,”Sopko told the lawmakers. “All of the fragile gains we have made over the last 12 years on women’s issues, health, education, rule of law, and governance are now, more than ever, in jeopardy of being wiped out by the narcotics trade which not only supports the insurgency, but also feeds organized crime and corruption.”

While many of the numbers included in the inspector general’s investigation have been made public before, the report . . .

Continue reading.

Mother Jones has an excellent article on this: We Spent $7.6 Billion to Crush the Afghan Opium Trade—and It’s Doing Better Than Ever

The NY Times has a report on Afghanistan as a narco-state.

Here’s an ABC News report. All those billions of dollars, totally pissed away to no purpose.

I earlier blogged the review of a new book on Afghanistan.

Written by LeisureGuy

21 October 2014 at 3:21 pm

How marijuana legalization in Colorado and Washington may make the world a better place

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Very interesting article by Christopher Ingraham at the Washington Post:

No pressure, Colorado and Washington, but the world is scrutinizing your every move.

That was the take-home message of an event today at the Brookings Institution, discussing the international impact of the move toward marijuana legalization at the state-level in the U.S. Laws passed in Colorado and Washington, with other states presumably to come, create a tension with the U.S. obligations toward three major international treaties governing drug control. Historically the U.S. has been a strong advocate of all three conventions, which “commit the United States to punish and even criminalize activity related to recreational marijuana,” according to Brookings’ Wells Bennet.

The U.S. response to this tension has thus far been to call for more “flexibility” in how countries interpret them. This policy was made explicit in recent remarks by Assistant Secretary of State William Brownfield, who last week at the United Nations said that “we have to be tolerant of different countries, in response to their own national circumstances and conditions, exploring and using different national drug control policies.” He went on: “How could I, a representative of the Government of the United States of America, be intolerant of a government that permits any experimentation with legalization of marijuana if two of the 50 states of the United States of America have chosen to walk down that road?”

As far as policy stances go this is an aggressively pragmatic solution. . .

Continue reading. Certainly a change of tune after the verbal abuse the US has heaped on other countries that dared to liberalize their drug laws in the light of the obvious failure of the US approach.

Written by LeisureGuy

17 October 2014 at 6:28 pm

Posted in Drug laws

The unintended consequences of meth laws

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Very interesting analysis of unexpected outcomes from laws to attack the meth problem.

Written by LeisureGuy

15 October 2014 at 10:27 am

Posted in Daily life, Drug laws

A rational approach to a (local) medical marijuana dispensary

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I am particularly taken with the idea of a two-story structure, the upper story available at no cost to police department as a substation—and it’s directly across the street from the source of most of their police calls. So the police get an assist, the public gets an assist, and the marijuana dispensary gets terrific security. (In California, dispensaries tend to have lots of cash because banks don’t want to run afoul of Federal laws on laundering drug money. So security is indeed an issue, and I bet this approach is a very cost-effective solution.)

Here’s the story.

Written by LeisureGuy

13 October 2014 at 1:47 pm

Where and to what degree marijuana is legal

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Very interesting interactive chart at Washington Post. Worth the click, and hover over chart entries for more info.

Written by LeisureGuy

13 October 2014 at 10:19 am

Posted in Drug laws

Mexico is failing badly

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It simply cannot protect its own citizens. It’s amazing to me that we do not legalize drugs now—though we’ve already made the cartels wealthy and powerful, there’s no need to keep it up. Addiction is then treated as a medical problem.

Written by LeisureGuy

9 October 2014 at 6:05 pm

Posted in Drug laws, Government

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