Later On

A blog written for those whose interests more or less match mine.

Helix Nebula

with 3 comments

Recall the Larry Nivens & Jerry Pournelle’s science-fiction novel The Mote in God’s Eye? Here it is. (Click to enlarge.) Full info on photo (taken with infrared light).

More on this nebula.

Written by Leisureguy

13 February 2007 at 12:58 pm

3 Responses

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  1. why are nebulas diffrent colors and how do they get there colors

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    bobby

    19 May 2008 at 9:58 am

  2. In some of the photos you see, the colors are not the true colors but rather reflect composition and/or the wave length of the light. I would imagine that the dust clouds would fluoresce differently depending on the same factors. But I’m no astronomer…

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    LeisureGuy

    19 May 2008 at 12:56 pm

  3. LeisureGuy, you are actually correct. I’m not sure of the method this photo was taken with, but your theory is valid. The different filters and methods of capturing a photo from space can reveal different color due to radiation, electromagnetic waves, and more! I’m not a professional Astronomer either, but I am an aspiring star-gazer. There’s plenty of information out there that’s easily understood by the day-to-day layman.

    To answer the original question of how they get their colors, a different hue in any given filtered photo gives scientists an idea of how much oxygen, hydrogen, and other elements are present in the star or nebula. It can also give an idea of temperature (But I wouldn’t use them to predict where MY summer vacation would take place. Most of space is very cold, and where it isn’t… well, it tends to be very hot!).

    Happy Star-Gazing!

    Like

    Muralesca

    22 June 2008 at 12:32 pm


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