Later On

A blog written for those whose interests more or less match mine.

Archive for June 27th, 2007

“Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses…”

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“and I will kill them.” The NY Times:

Sandra M. Kenley was returning home from her native Barbados in 2005 when she was swept into the United States’ fastest-growing form of incarceration, immigration detention.

Seven weeks later, Ms. Kenley died in a rural Virginia jail, where she had complained of not receiving medicine for high blood pressure. She was one of 62 immigrants to die in administrative custody since 2004, according to a new tally by Immigration and Customs Enforcement that counted many more deaths than the 20 previously known.

No government body is charged with accounting for deaths in immigration detention, a patchwork of county jails, privately run prisons and federal facilities where more than 27,500 people who are not American citizens are held on any given day while the government decides whether to deport them.

Getting details about those who die in custody is a difficult undertaking left to family members, advocacy groups and lawyers.

But as the immigration detention system balloons to meet demands for stricter enforcement of immigration laws, deaths in custody — and the secrecy and confusion around them — are drawing increased scrutiny from lawmakers and from government investigators.

Spurred by bipartisan reports of abuses in detention, the Senate unanimously passed an amendment to the proposed immigration bill that would establish an office of detention oversight within the Department of Homeland Security. Detention capacity would grow by 20,000 beds, or 73 percent, under the bill, which is expected to be debated again today in the Senate.

Complaints focus on a lack of independent oversight and failures to enforce standards for medical care, suicide prevention and access to legal help.

The inspector general in the Department of Homeland Security recently announced a “special review” of two deaths, including that of a Korean woman at a privately run detention center in Albuquerque. Fellow detainees told a lawyer that the woman, Young Sook Kim, had pleaded for medical care for weeks, but received scant attention until her eyes yellowed and she stopped eating.

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Written by LeisureGuy

27 June 2007 at 4:30 pm

GOP: the party of obstructionism

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Written by LeisureGuy

27 June 2007 at 4:09 pm

Posted in Congress, GOP

Fred Thompson: a fountain of misinformation

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God help us if this (lazy) guy becomes President. Here is a summary of the tripe he serves.

Written by LeisureGuy

27 June 2007 at 1:05 pm

Posted in Election, GOP

Razor finds

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So I was prowling eBay and saw this (somewhat uninformative) photo:

razor

The complete description: “Vintage used Gillette Double Edge Razor twist to open and put the blade in and take it out.”

It looked a lot like a Gillette President, a razor from the 50’s that’s been under discussion. The handle certainly looked like a President, and since the description did not say “adjustable” (a fact that would surely be mentioned), I thought it probably was a President. But note that you cannot see the top of the razor—always a bad sign.

Still, I bought it, and when it arrived, the top of the razor was indeed bad: a brownish streak along the tops of both silo doors, as if the chrome had been scraped off with some heavy metal. I picked at it with my fingernail—and it came off! The chrome wasn’t scraped away, but something (like resin) was stuck on top of the chrome!

Thank heavens for the ultrasonic cleaner. I cleaned the little guy up, and though there were a few scratches at the top of the silo door, it was overall in very good shape. Not “fine,” not “mint,” but I would say “very good.”

For the post-cleaning photos, see here. (I’m selling it because, after winning this, I won a President in really fine shape.)

Written by LeisureGuy

27 June 2007 at 12:56 pm

Posted in Shaving

Software note: Webroot Spysweeper

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The new release of Webroot Spysweeper, which on my computer deals with both spyware and viruses, did funny things to Firefox—like now I have to log in anew whenever I have closed a tab that held a forum, my blog, etc. Same thing happened to The Wife, and she found the (simple) fix: re-install Firefox.

Apparently, with Webroot now paying more attention to Firefox, the new version wrote over some settings. Reinstalling Firefox fixed everything up.

Written by LeisureGuy

27 June 2007 at 12:38 pm

Posted in Firefox, Software

Mainstream journalists: assume the best

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Glenn Greenwald points out the enormous leap of faith made by the journalist:

In an otherwise solid NYT article comparing recently revealed CIA abuses of the past and the Bush administration’s current controversial intelligence activities, Scott Shane wrote:

The Bush administration chose to bypass the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, created in 1978 to oversee eavesdropping on American soil. The Senate and House Intelligence Committees, created to make sure past abuses would never be repeated, did little to rein in the N.S.A. wiretapping program or to set limits on interrogation practices until news reports set off a furor. On the other hand, the recent surveillance activities appear so far to have been aimed at mostly people believed to pose a terrorist threat, not a political threat. So far there is no evidence of anything comparable, for example, to the F.B.I.’s relentless pursuit and harassment of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. or the political abuses of Watergate.

This passage, in light of the bolded sentence, is simply misleading. There is no basis whatsoever for claiming that Bush’s NSA warrantless (and illegal) eavesdropping activities were “aimed at mostly people believed to pose a terrorist threat, not a political threat.” It is true — as Shane writes — that “there is no evidence” that the administration used its eavesdropping powers against, say, political opponents, but that fact is not exculpatory, because there is “no evidence” at all, one way or the other, regarding how the administration eavesdropped. There has been no disclosure by the administration of any kind — not to Congress, nor to courts, nor to anyone else — of information revealing who was subjected to the administration’s warrantless eavesdropping program, a program which (by its terms and by design) was conducted in complete secrecy. To this day, that remains the overarching unresolved question — what was the administration doing when it eavesdropped on Americans in secret, on whom did they eavesdrop, how were the targets chosen, what was done with the information? That is precisely the information which nobody — including even the Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman, Jay Rockefeller — has been able to discover.

Continue reading.

Written by LeisureGuy

27 June 2007 at 12:31 pm

Norman Mineta testimony on 9/11

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From a reader, this report of Mineta’s testimony on what occurred on 9/11.

Written by LeisureGuy

27 June 2007 at 11:41 am

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