Later On

A blog written for those whose interests more or less match mine.

Using drugs to treat pathological gambling

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I wouldn’t have thought of this:

 In a two-phase pilot study involving 27 subjects (12 female, 15 male) with DSM-IV PG (pathological gambling), results indicate that supplementation with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) may be efficacious in reducing PG. The first phase of the study was a 2-week open-label trial during which the subjects received a mean effective dose of 1476.9 mg/day of NAC. At 2-week end, 59.3% of the subjects (n=16: NAC responders) demonstrated a 30% or more reduction in Yale Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale Modified for Pathological Gambling (PG-YBOCS) score. In the second phase of the study, the 16 NAC responders from the first phase were randomized in a double-blind fashion to NAC or placebo for a period of 6 weeks. At intervention end, 83.3% of subjects in the NAC-supplemented group, compared to 28.6% of subjects in the placebo group still met responder criteria – defined as 30% or more reduction in PG-YBOCS score. Thus, the results of this study suggest that supplementation with NAC may b e effective in the treatment of pathological gambling. Additional studies are warranted.

“N-acetyl cysteine, a glutamate-modulating agent, in the treatment of pathological gambling: a pilot study,” Grant JE, Kim SW, Odlaug BL, Biol Psychiatry, 2007; 62(6): 652-7. (Address: Department of Psychiatry University of Minnesota School of Medicine, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. E-mail: grant045@umn.edu).

Written by Leisureguy

17 September 2007 at 10:08 am

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