Later On

A blog written for those whose interests more or less match mine.

Angler promises to be interesting

with one comment

I already placed a hold on the copy that’s on order at the Pacific Grove Public Library. Here’s an article based on the book:

A burst of ferocity stunned the room into silence. No other word for it: The vice president’s attorney was shouting.

“The president doesn’t want this! [1] You are not going to see the opinions. You are out . . . of . . . your . . . lane!”

Five government lawyers had gathered around a small conference table in the Justice Department command center. Four were expected. David S. Addington, counsel to Vice President Cheney, got wind of the meeting and invited himself.

If Addington smelled revolt, he was not far wrong. Unwelcome questions about warrantless domestic surveillance had begun to find their voice.

Cheney and his counsel would struggle for months to quash the legal insurgency. By the time President Bush became aware of it, his No. 2 had stoked dissent into flat-out rebellion. The president would face a dilemma, and the presidency itself a historic test. Cheney would come close to leading them off a cliff, man and office both [2].

On this second Monday in December 2003, Addington’s targets were a pair of would-be auditors from the National Security Agency. He had displeasure to spare for their Justice Department hosts.

Perfect example, right here. A couple of NSA bureaucrats breeze in and ask for the most sensitive documents in the building. And Justice wants to tell them, Help yourselves? This was going to be a very short meeting.

Joel Brenner and Vito Potenza, the two men wilting under Addington’s wrath, had driven 26 miles from Fort Meade, the NSA’s eavesdropping headquarters in Maryland. They were conducting a review of their agency’s two-year-old special surveillance operation. They already knew the really secret stuff [3]: The NSA and other services had been unleashed to turn their machinery inward, collecting signals intelligence inside the United States. What the two men didn’t know was why the Bush administration believed the program was legal.

It was an awkward question. Potenza, the NSA’s acting general counsel, and Brenner, its inspector general, were supposed to be the ones who kept their agency on the straight and narrow. That’s what Cheney and their boss, Lt. Gen. Michael V. Hayden, told doubters among the very few people who knew what was going on. Cheney, who chaired briefings for select members of Congress, said repeatedly that the NSA’s top law and ethics officers — career public servants — approved and supervised the surveillance program.

That was not exactly true, not without one of those silent asterisks that secretly flip a sentence on its tail. Every 45 days, after Justice Department review, Bush renewed his military order for warrantless eavesdropping. Brenner and Potenza told Hayden that the agency was entitled to rely on those orders [4]. The United States was at war with al-Qaeda, intelligence-gathering is inherent in war, and the Constitution appoints the president commander in chief.

But they had not been asked to give their own written assessments of the legality of domestic espionage. They based their answer in part on the attorney general’s certification of the “form and legality” of the president’s orders. Yet neither man had been allowed to see the program’s codeword-classified legal analyses [5], which were prepared by John C. Yoo, Addington’s close ally in the Justice Department’s Office of Legal Counsel. Now they wanted to read Yoo’s opinions for themselves [6].

Continue reading. Much more at the link.

Written by Leisureguy

14 September 2008 at 10:58 am

One Response

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  1. I was confused for a second, because I thought you were speaking of this Angler book.

    TYD

    14 September 2008 at 11:23 am


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