Later On

A blog written for those whose interests more or less match mine.

Final words by James Fallows on Obama and China

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One more post, it seems:

Yes, there are more!

1) We All Know that Obama was humiliated and stonewalled by the haughty Chinese leaders, in contrast to the titanic American presidents of yore who spoke sternly to Mao and his successors and therefore always got just what they wanted in Beijing. Richard Cohen of the Washington Post has reminded us of his fecklessness again.

And yet…  my favorite newspaper of all, the (state-controlled) China Daily, has just indicated in its November 25 edition that China’s recent year-long freeze on the value of the RMB may be about to end. (Thanks to my friend Jeremy Goldkorn, of Danwei.org in Beijing, for the tip.) If Obama had “demanded” this in public, or insisted that it be announced while he was standing next to Hu Jintao in Beijing, his “toughness” might have received better one-day coverage in the U.S. press or on SNL.  But the chances of his getting what he was after would be nil. Of course, the chances are still uncertain. But this was the major item on the economic-rebalancing agenda; and the Administration’s argument all along was that influencing China’s behavior was a long game. This news story is not conclusive but does support rather than weaken the long-game approach.

2) We All Know that the Shanghai town hall was an embarrassment, because the audience was packed with young Communist Party stalwarts who could be depended on to ask anodyne questions. (“What’s the best step toward a Nobel Prize?” etc.)

But remember the moment when Obama turned to Ambassador Jon Huntsman and said more or less, “Jon, did any questions come in via the internet?” I now have heard from enough different informed sources to be comfortable saying that the Chinese government did not know this was coming, and that the ensuing discussion about the Great FireWall was not at all according to their script. Jeremy Goldkorn adds a note about that question — whose answer, as I mentioned earlier, has the potential to resonate within China. Goldkorn says:

“The Great FireWall question at the Shanghai town hall came directly from the blogger briefing arranged by the Embassy and consulates in Shanghai and Guangzhou.

“I attended the briefing and live tweeted it. The bloggers included Anti and Bei Feng, two of the loudest voices calling for open media in China at the moment, but also Rao Jin from AntiCNN.com. The most common question, asked several times by different bloggers, was if Obama knew about the Great FireWall and if he would do something about it.”

3) Most Americans don’t know about the Southern Weekend interview — the one interview Obama gave to a Chinese publication, and not to the People’s Daily or CCTV but to …

Continue reading.

Written by LeisureGuy

25 November 2009 at 2:24 pm

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