Later On

A blog written for those whose interests more or less match mine.

What is the word for when police departments secretly spy and build dossiers on citizens who have done nothing wrong?

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Haven’t we seen this movie in other countries? The Associated Press has an article by Adam Goldman and Matt Apuzzo:

He saw something. He said something. And he inadvertently uncovered a secret spying operation that the New York Police Department was running outside its jurisdiction.

In June 2009, a building superintendent at an apartment complex near the Rutgers University campus opened the door to unit 1076 to conduct an inspection. Tenants had been notified of the inspection weeks ago and the notice was still stuck to the door.

He turned his key, walked in and immediately knew something was wrong. A colleague called 911.

“What’s suspicious?” a New Brunswick police dispatcher asked.

“Suspicious in the sense that the apartment has about – has no furniture except two beds, has no clothing, has New York City Police Department radios,” he replied.

“Really?” the dispatcher asked, her voice rising with surprise.

The caller, Salil Sheth, and his colleagues had stumbled upon one of the NYPD’s biggest secrets: a safe house, a place where undercover officers working well outside the department’s jurisdiction could lie low and coordinate surveillance.

Since the terror attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, the NYPD, with training and guidance from the CIA, has monitored the activities of Muslims in New York and far beyond. Detectives infiltrated mosques, eavesdropped in cafes and kept tabs on Muslim student groups, including at Rutgers.

The NYPD kept files on sermons, recorded the names of political organizers in police documents, and built databases of where Muslims lived and shopped, even where they were likely to gather to watch sports. Out-of-state operations, like the one in New Brunswick, were one aspect of this larger intelligence-gathering effort.

The Associated Press previously described the discovery of the NYPD inside the New Jersey apartment but, after a yearlong fight, New Brunswick police released the tape of the 911 call and other materials this week.

“There’s computer hardware, software, you know, just laying around,” Sheth continued. “There’s pictures of terrorists. There’s pictures of our neighboring building that they have.”

“In New Brunswick?” the dispatcher asked, sounding as confused as the caller.

New York authorities have encouraged people like Sheth to call 911. In its “Eight Signs of Terrorism,” people are encouraged to call the police if they see evidence of surveillance, information gathering, suspicious activities or anything that looks out of place. The Homeland Security Department has long encouraged citizens to be vigilant under its “See Something, Say Something” campaign.

The call from the building superintendent sent New Brunswick police and the FBI rushing to the apartment complex. Officers and agents were surprised at what they found. None had been told that the NYPD was in town. . .

Continue reading.

This operation and this sort of activity seems clearly illegal and unconstitutional to me. I wonder if any sanctions or punishments were applied—for example, how many lost their job over this? (My guess: zero. For one thing, note the 3-year fight to keep the entire incident a secret. And how the operations switches from a police operation (so it must be kept secret) to not a police operation (so it’s okay to do it outside their jurisdiction. The entire operation was done in bad faith.)

We have come to this: police departments deploying their own covert operations in other states (note in the rest of the story: as far away as New Orleans). I do not believe that this is a sensible use of tax dollars.

Written by Leisureguy

25 July 2012 at 11:14 am

Posted in Government, Law

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