Later On

A blog written for those whose interests more or less match mine.

Mystic Water Sensitive Skin shaving soap

with 2 comments

Today I tried a new Mystic Water shaving soap: the unscented soap for sensitive skin. Ingredients:

Calendula officinalis (Marigold) flower, aloe vera, sea buckthorn berry oil and allantoin.  Unscented and without coconut oil.

The brush is my very nice Whipped Dog silvertip badger with resin handle. I believe that’s the 22mm brush, and it got a really wonderful lather from the soap, which is the color of summertime Guernsey cream: a deep creamy yellow. Although the soap is unfragranced, it has a very nice scent indeed, simply from the ingredients: a clean, light, uplifting scent that I like a lot.

The lather was wonderful and though my skin is not particularly sensitive, I’ll be using this soap regularly. It does include tallow, of a very high quality. As she notes:

Tallow in soap makes an exceptionally slick and slippery lather and is a highly regarded ingredient in many of the finest traditional shaving soaps.   I use pure, food-grade tallow combined with unrefined shea nut butter, avocado and other oils, saponified using sodium and potassium hydroxide and with the addition of soothing aloe vera, bentonite clay, silk, and extra glycerin.  The result is a soft soap that lathers quickly with a brush to make a thick, creamy, protective lather that is gentle and non-drying, excellent for even sensitive skin and tough beards.

And note this, from her Shaving Soap FAQ:

What are the ingredients in your shaving soap?

The main ingredient in my shaving soap is food-grade tallow. I like to render the tallow myself from beef suet that I get from a fellow farmers market vendor who raises grass fed beef on her local Maryland farm. I add organic unrefined shea nut butter, castor oil, palm oil, avocado oil and stearic acid along with extra glycerin, bentonite clay, aloe vera leaf juice and dissolved silk. The oils are saponified with both sodium and potassium hydroxide to make a soap that is in between a cream and a hard soap.

Is your soap good for sensitive skin?

I formulated this soap without coconut oil on purpose to make it more gentle. If you have allergies to fragrances and really sensitive skin, the unscented soap is probably the best one to try first. However, you should always check the ingredients of any new product to make sure there is nothing to which you are allergic. And, some of the oils may be produced in facilities that also process nuts so I can’t guarantee that there might not be traces of peanut or other nut oils – please do a patch test if in doubt.

The particular ingredients of this soap can be seen on the label—click photo to enlarge.

Three easy passes with the Gillette Special Adjustable with a Kai blade, and a splash of Floïd aftershave on the smoothness resulting, and I dive into the Internet.

Written by LeisureGuy

17 November 2012 at 12:58 pm

Posted in Shaving

2 Responses

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  1. I notice that you don’t seem to worry about your soap and aftershave having the same fragrance… how do you go about figuring out what will and will not clash? I have a couple creams and soaps that I like, but don’t have any specific aftershave for them. Not having a wonderful sense of smell, I’d prefer not to go out and clear rooms just by entering 🙂

    Jeff Beyea

    17 November 2012 at 3:36 pm

  2. I like to use the same fragrance for soap and aftershave occasionally, or mix them up creatively (Lime soap, bay rum aftershave, for example). But in my experience the soap fragrance doesn’t linger and the aftershave fragrance totally dominates. This soap even more so, since it’s unfragranced.

    LeisureGuy

    17 November 2012 at 5:26 pm


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