Later On

A blog written for those whose interests more or less match mine.

Slow-cooked Boston baked beans: The Eldest recommends

with one comment

The Eldest just called to say that this recipe was terrific. Ingredients:

1 pound (2 to 2 1/4 cups) dry white beans such as Navy beans or Great Northern beans (can also use kidney beans)
1/3 cup molasses
1/3 cup brown sugar
3-4 Tbsp Dijon mustard
1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
3 cups hot water
1/2 pound salt pork (can substitute bacon), cut into 1/2-inch to 1-inch pieces
1 medium onion, (1 1/2 cups) chopped

She went with the bacon, since some said (in comments) that the salt pork was too salty. We had a good laugh at the idea of using a medium onion.

She soaked beans overnight, and then they had to soak through the day while she was at work, so they were well-soaked. She put it together in the slow-cooker overnight and said she awoke the next morning drooling at the fragrances wafting through the house.

I’ll make it soon, but I just got a smoked ham shank that I’m going to cook overnight in a 200F oven, with just a little water (or not: still deciding), and then tomorrow add onion, carrots, celery, two cans of beans, drained and rinsed (one can pinto, one can black), and shredded cabbage, water, and perhaps Penzeys Ham Soup Base to make a rainy-day soup. Maybe some rice?

Written by Leisureguy

30 November 2012 at 4:17 pm

Posted in Food, Recipes & Cooking

One Response

Subscribe to comments with RSS.

  1. DURGIN PARK BOSTON BAKED BEANS

    * Exported from MasterCook * Boston Baked Beans in Bean Pot Recipe By : Durgin-Park Restaurant, Boston, MA
    ——– ———— ——————————–
    1 2 1/2-quart bean pot or covered casserole
    1 pound beans*
    1/2 teaspoon baking soda
    1/2 pound salt pork
    1/2 medium onion — peeled and uncut
    4 tablespoons sugar
    1/3 cup molasses
    1 teaspoon dry mustard
    1 teaspoon salt
    1/4 teaspoon pepper
    *Use California pea beans, York State beans or small white beans. Soak beans overnight.
    In the morning, preheat oven to 325° F.
    Place the baking soda in a Dutch oven and fill half way with water. Bring to a boil and add the beans. Boil for 10 minutes.
    Drain beans in a colander and run cold water through them. Set aside.
    Dice the salt pork (available in the bacon section of the grocery store) into 1-inch squares.
    Put half of the salt pork on the bottom of the bean pot, along with the onion.
    Put beans in the pot. Put the remaining salt pork on top of the beans.
    Mix the sugar, molasses, mustard, salt and pepper with 3 cups of hot water and pour over the beans.
    Cover pot with lid and place the pot into the preheated oven. Bake for 6 hours. Check pot periodically to check the amount of liquid.
    Add water to the beans slowly as needed to keep them moist; do not flood them. Remove the pot from the oven and serve.
    Makes about 7 cups.
    NOTE: The Durgin-Park, a Boston restaurant whose origins date back to the American Revolution, is famous for its Boston baked beans, baked Indian pudding and apple pan dowdy. Durgin-Park cook Tommy Ryan has prepared this recipe at the restaurant for the past 37 years. Durgin-Park serves 1,000 diners on an average Saturday evening. The waitresses have a reputation for their long memories: the second time you come in, you get the same thing you ordered the first time–unless you speak fast. From The Sacramento Bee, September 2, 1998. Formatted for MasterCook by cranew@foothill.net

    Like

    Bob Slaughter

    1 December 2012 at 9:38 am


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: