Later On

A blog written for those whose interests more or less match mine.

Two approaches to governing

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One, as we see, is to shut down the government if you don’t agree with a law already passed and found legal by the Supreme Court. Another, pointed out by a reader of this good column by Ezra Klein:

In May 2007, 140 Democrats in the House of Representatives voted to defund the Iraq war. In September of the same year, Congress voted to increase the debt limit. Imagine if Nancy Pelosi and the Democrats had threatened to breach the debt ceiling unless Republicans agreed to defund the war. At that time, approval of the Iraq war was polled at 33% in favor and 64% against.

In current polling of the Affordable Care Act, more people support than oppose the ACA, and a significant majority opposes shutting down the government.

Greg Sargent in the Washington Post boils the crisis down to two sentences:

1) Only one party is demanding major concessions from the other in exchange for keeping the government open at sequester spending levels – levels leaders of that same party have already declared is a victory for them — while the other party is demanding exactly nothing in exchange for doing that.

2) Only one party is demanding major concessions from the other in exchange for making it possible for the U.S. to pay its bills — an outcome leaders of the same party have already declared is necessary to spare the country default and economic havoc – while the other party is demanding exactly nothing in exchange for doing that.

And at the first link above, Ezra Klein’s article is worth reading. It begins:

1) This is all about stopping a law that increases taxes on rich people and reduces subsidies to private insurers in Medicare in order to help low-income Americans buy health insurance. That’s it. That’s why the Republican Party might shut down the government and default on the debt.

2) The “continuing resolution” only funds the government for six weeks. So even if all goes well Monday night we’ll be doing this again in November.

3) Republicans are now discussing a “one-week CR,” which would mean we’d be doing this again in seven days — and we’d be that much closer to the debt ceiling.

4) The leadership of the Republican Party agrees that the debt ceiling absolutely must be lifted. “I’m not going to risk the full faith and credit of the federal government,” House Speaker John Boehner said. But they also maintain that they are willing to breach the debt limit, risking the full faith and credit of the federal government. As my colleague Greg Sargent has written in the Plum Line, this is a “glaring contradiction” at the heart of the GOP’s position.

5) A few months ago, . . .

Continue reading.

Written by Leisureguy

1 October 2013 at 10:03 am

Posted in GOP, Government, Healthcare

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