Later On

A blog written for those whose interests more or less match mine.

Businesses show their concern for asthma patients: Zero

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Kevin Drum writes at Mother Jones:

Dr. Russell Saunders is pissed off:

As I’m sure comes as no surprise, I prescribe a lot of medications….One medication I prescribe with great frequency is albuterol, a bronchodilator. Asthma is a very common childhood illness, and one that primary care providers can often manage without consulting subspecialists.

….So I prescribe a lot of albuterol [inhalers]. Or rather, I would if they existed. Unfortunately, albuterol inhalers per se are not currently on the market. What my patients really get are prescriptions for Proventil or Ventolin or Proair. There are, at this time, precisely zero generic albuterol [inhalers] on the market.

The reason why there are none on the market and thus patients (or their insurance companies, if they are blessed with good coverage) are forced to pay for the name brands is contained in this horrifying and infuriating article about pharmaceutical pricing in the New York Times. If it does not make your blood boil, then I congratulate you for having a more even temperament than I.

I’m pretty sure that I don’t have a more even temperament than Saunders, but I do have one advantage over him: I already knew what was going on with asthma inhalers even before Elisabeth Rosenthal’s piece—the latest in her series about the high cost of American health care—appeared a few days ago.

Here’s the short version of the story: as Saunders says, albuterol is a cheap medication because it went off patent long ago. Then, a few years ago, as part of the campaign to eliminate CFCs and save the ozone layer, CFC-based inhalers were set to be banned. Pharmaceutical companies took advantage of this to design new delivery systems and surround them with a thicket of patents. As a result, even though albuterol itself might be off patent, only name-brand asthma inhalers are available—and since there was no generic competition the big pharmaceutical companies were free to jack up prices to their heart’s content. And they did. After all, as Rosenthal points out, this isn’t like acne medicine that you can do without if it costs too much. If you have asthma, you need an inhaler, period.

Is your blood boiling? Well, wait a bit. The story is actually even worse than this. . .

Continue reading.

Written by Leisureguy

16 October 2013 at 10:35 am

Posted in Business, Medical

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