Later On

A blog written for those whose interests more or less match mine.

Archive for January 2014

Good impromptu one-dish meal

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I just made this up because I had a bunch of collards to use.

Pre-heat oven to 225ºF. Take a 3-qt cast-iron pot, and put in it:

1 smoked ham shank
1/3 c. water

Cover and cook in oven for 6-7 hours. Let cool somewhat, then remove remove meat from bone and discard the bone, reserving the meat.  Add to the pot (which still contains the fat from the ham shank):

1 large Spanish onion, chopped

Sauté for several minutes, then add:

1/4 c finely chopped garlic

Cook for about a minute, then add:

the meat from the ham shanks
1 bunch collards, chopped small, stems minced
1 bunch kale, chopped small, stems minced
3 c water
2 Tbsp sherry vinegar

Bring to simmer and cover. Cook for 5-10 minutes so greens wilt. Then add:

about 3/4 lb small fingerling potatoes, I would guess—I just got a couple of handfuls.

Cover and simmer for 50 minutes or so.

It turned out to be quite tasty. A little pepper sauce would go well, but it doesn’t agree with The Wife.

Written by LeisureGuy

31 January 2014 at 6:35 pm

Posted in Food, Recipes

Avocado lassi

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Just made it. Tastes good.

Written by LeisureGuy

31 January 2014 at 2:58 pm

Posted in Food, Recipes

Stephen Glass reconsidered

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He’s unrepentant. But the story of his unmasking is very interesting.

Written by LeisureGuy

31 January 2014 at 2:36 pm

Posted in Media

Watch how a NY Times editorial turns a fact into “he said/she said”

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NY Times editorial today omitted a word in one sentence, which seriously changed the meaning, but it did produce the familiar “he said/she said” formulation so beloved by the Times.

Sentence as printed:

A group called the Marijuana Policy Project has even bought space on five billboards in New Jersey, where the game will take place on Sunday, asking why the league disallows a substance that, the group says, is less harmful than alcohol.

Sentence without the “he said/she said” twist:

A group called the Marijuana Policy Project has even bought space on five billboards in New Jersey, where the game will take place on Sunday, asking why the league disallows a substance that, as the group says, is less harmful than alcohol.

The fact that marijuana is less harmful than alcohol is well established. Alcohol damages the body in many ways, is much more addictive than marijuana, and is lethal in overdose while marijuana is not. This is not in dispute.

Perhaps the editors could try to be less timorous about embracing well established facts. It would be a nice change. (I’m not holding my breath.)

In the meantime, one-fourth of the male population of Russia dies before age 55. The reason: vodka.

Written by LeisureGuy

31 January 2014 at 2:10 pm

Posted in Drug laws, NY Times

Christie Knew About Lane Closings, Ex-Port Authority Official Says

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Wow. It’s a little early on Friday for this to break.

Written by LeisureGuy

31 January 2014 at 1:38 pm

Posted in GOP, Government, Law

Tagged with

Change.org petition: Remove marijuana from Schedule I drugs

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You can sign here.

Written by LeisureGuy

31 January 2014 at 1:34 pm

Even Texas Prison Guards Want Less Use of Solitary Confinement

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Nicole Flatow writes for ThinkProgress:

In the past, prison unions have been seen as one of the primary obstacles to some criminal justice reforms, particularly reform of solitary confinement. But in a letter obtained by the Texas Observer, the state’s largest prison union is now calling for the state to curb its use of prisoner isolation.

“As the president of the largest correctional professional organization in Texas I am calling on the Texas Department of Criminal Justice to change the death row plan to positively impact both the correctional staff and offenders on Texas death row,” American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) Local 3807 President Lance Lowry wrote.

Solitary confinement has been called torturecruel and unusual, and a living death because of the affect it has on inmates, particularly the mentally ill. But from the union’s perspective, it also increases the risks to the guards because it tends to foster violence. The union argues that in solitary, “inmates have very few privileges to lose” and staff become easy targets. Instead, “the Texas death row plan needs to address tools that can manage positive behavior” — bolstering arguments against solitary confinement that extend beyond just death row inmates.

The letter says increased confinement of death row inmates in solitary housing that keeps them in their cells 23 hours a day and allows them almost no interaction with other prisoners was a “knee jerk reaction” to an inmate’s escape that “ignored the root of the problem” — lack of staff competency.

Recently, a Virginia federal judge held the automatic solitary confinement of all death row inmates unconstitutional, and other courts have held the practice unconstitutional as applied to the mentally ill. But the practice remains rampant in some prisons, despite widespread opposition and protest.

The old assumption is that corrections officers are inclined to lobby for policies that create jobs for corrections officers. But this is one of several areas in which prison employees are now joining the movement for criminal justice reform in the name of officer safety and prisoner humanity. A few months ago, the world’s largest correctional association called for the elimination of mandatory minimum prison terms.

Written by LeisureGuy

31 January 2014 at 11:05 am

Posted in Government, Law

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