Later On

A blog written for those whose interests more or less match mine.

US law enforcement in action: Austin police body-slam black teacher, tell her blacks have ‘violent tendencies’

leave a comment »

Not all police officers are like those in this report by Michael Miller in the Washington Post. Indeed, I imagine a very small minority are. But they are protected by police unions and by police departments: the miscreants remain on the force and are often promoted. The police need to rid themselves of such officer, but the police so far have shown zero inclination to do so.

Miller’s report begins:

Officials in Austin are investigating the violent arrest of a black elementary school teacher who was body-slammed by a white police officer during a traffic stop.

The investigation comes after the emergence of police video footage showing not only the June 2015 arrest but also a scene afterward, when another white officer told the teacher that cops are wary of blacks because of their “violent tendencies” and “intimidating” appearance.

“Ninety-nine percent of the time … it is the black community that is being violent,” the officer tells her. “That’s why a lot of white people are afraid. And I don’t blame them.”

The footage, first reported Thursday by the Austin American-Statesmanand KVUE, prompted an apology from police.

“My heart was sickened and saddened when I first learned of this incident,” said Austin Police Chief Art Acevedo, adding that the video was “disturbing.”

“For those that think life is perfect for people of color, I want you to listen to that conversation and tell me we don’t have social issues in this nation,” Acevedo continued. “Issues of bias. Issues of racism. Issues of people being looked at different because of their color.”

The controversy comes as the country remains on edge over issues of race and law enforcement. Footage of fatal police encounters and their aftermaths in Louisiana and Minnesota this month helped revive protests over how law enforcement officer use deadly force, while the deadly shootings of police officers in Dallas and Baton Rouge have spurred further fears among officers over the threats they face on the job.

The Austin video emerged a day after bystander footage showed Florida police aiming their weapons at an unarmed black man as he lay on the ground with his hands in the air. A North Miami police officer ultimately shot the man in the leg as he tried to help a young man with autism.

Prosecutors told the Statesman they first viewed the video about two weeks ago and will likely present the case to a grand jury.

The video also prompted them to dismiss a resisting arrest charge against the teacher, 26-year-old Breaion King.

King broke down as she talked about the day last summer she was body-slammed by police.

“I’ve become fearful to live my life,” she told the Statesman. “I would rather stay home. I’ve become afraid of the people who are supposed to protect me and take care of me.”

‘Oh my God. Why are you doing this to me?’

Austin police on Thursday screened two videos of the incident on June 15, 2015.

The first video, taken by officer Bryan Richter’s dashboard camera, begins around 12:30 p.m. with the officer parked near a busy Austin street.

King, on her lunch break, passes in her white Nissan Versa — traveling 15 miles per hour over the speed limit, according to Richter. He then pulls out and pursues her, activating his siren.

It’s unclear from the video if King is aware of the officer before she turns left into a parking lot.

As she climbs out of her car, Richter tells her to stop.

“Ma’am, you’re being pulled over right now, so I need you to take a seat back in your car,” he says.

“Are you serious?” King replies.

“Yes, ma’am,” he says. “I’m not joking. Can I see your driver’s license? You’re being stopped for speeding.”

“But I’m already stopped, so technically can you stop me?” King asks as she removes her license. “‘Cause you didn’t pull me over because I’m parked.”

“Ma’am, you were about to go inside without a wallet, so I know you were only coming here because you know I was coming to pull you over,” Richter responds. “I can absolutely pull you over if you are already stopped, yes. Let me see your driver’s license.”

Richter then asks her to put her feet inside the car so he can close the door.

(“I did this so that if she decided to exit the vehicle again, it would give me some sort of reaction time to her doing so, versus her being half way out of the vehicle with the door open giving her an easy escape,” he wrote in his report, according to the Statesman.)

“Could you please hurry up?” King says.

“Okay, ma’am, stand up for me,” Richter says, placing King’s license on top of her car and reaching inside after her.

“No, why are you grabbing me?” she shouts. “Oh my God.”

“Stop resisting,” the officer says multiple times as a struggle ensues — barely visible on the video — in the doorway of the car. At one point, the car horn blares as they tussle.

The officer then takes a step back and orders her to “get out of the car,” before calling for backup.

“I’m getting out,” she says. “Let me get out. Do not touch me.”

“Don’t touch me,” she says again as the cop reaches inside and grabs her.

“Get out of the car now,” he says, yanking her out of the vehicle and throwing her to the ground.

“Oh my God. Oh my God,” she screams. “Why are you doing this to me?”

Richter then orders her several times to put her hands behind her back.

“Oh my God. Are you serious?” King moans. “Oh my God.”

“I’m about to Tase you,” Richter says.

As he manages to get her hands behind her back, King stands up. Richter then tries to leg sweep, or trip, her. When that doesn’t work, he puts his arm around her neck.

There is a choking sound as the cop lifts the 112-pound woman into the air before slamming her down on the ground.

It appears as if King is partially able to break her fall with a hand and a foot.

The two continue to struggle.

“Put your hands behind your back,” Richter tells her.

“Would you let me get down please?” King says.

The cop then pushes his weight down onto her back.

“Put your hands behind your back,” he shouts.

“That’s what I was doing,” she says. “Are you serious? God.”

“Don’t stand up,” he tells her.

“I’m not trying to stand up,” she answers. “I’m trying to put my hands behind my back.”

“Are you serious,” she asks again as the officer puts her in handcuffs.

“Get up,” he says as he wrenches her up by her arms.

“Ow,” King says.

Another officer then appears on screen.

“Look at him,” King tells the second officer. “He’s treating me like sh––. I didn’t do anything.

“What are you doing?” she asks the officers as they put her up against the hood of Richter’s car and appear to search her. “I need a black police.”

“Walk,” Richter says, leading her off-screen by her arms, which are cuffed and pulled up behind her back at a roughly 90-degree angle.

“Why are my hands so high?” King asks.

“Stop fighting,” Richter can be heard saying.

“Jesus Christ,” he can be heard saying to another officer off-screen. “She has some fight in her. She didn’t agree I could pull her over when she was already parked.”

“So she came out of the car?” the other officer asks.

“Well, I told her to sit back down,” Richter tells his colleague. “And I kept telling her to get back in, close your door. ‘No.’ I said ‘All right, I’m just going to handcuff you and put you in the car. I’m not going to do this.’ And then she starts fighting.”

“You all right?” the other cop asks him. “You hurt? Injured?”

“No, I’m good,” Richter replies as King can be heard moaning. . .

Continue reading.

And do read the whole thing. Videos at the link.

The US has changed a lot. This sort of incident provides some insight into the source of Trump’s support.

Written by LeisureGuy

22 July 2016 at 4:55 pm

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s