Later On

A blog written for those whose interests more or less match mine.

A Persian Jar by another name, and a shave by Stealth

with 6 comments

The brush shown is clearly of the same shape as yesterday’s Persion Jar, but the name Rooney gave this shape is Style 2. (Rooney also offered Style 1 and Style 3, and those came ins Sizes 1, 2, and 3. The Style 2 however, comes only in that size, which corresponds to Size 1 for Styles 1 and 3. This nomenclature, though unambiguous, was at first confusing.)

I returned to working up the lather on my face instead of in a bowl, but with a new appreciation of carefully working in a little more water after i use the fully loaded brush to coat my stubble. The small driblets of water I add to the brush are worked into both the lather on my face and the lather in the brush by brushing briskly over my face and particularly my chin.

Dapper Doc’s Old-Time Lilac & Fig shaving soap is here in the CK-6 formula, so the lather was particularly good. This tub, BTW, is one of those that will not fit inside its own lid, a minor inconvenience for those whose bathrooms have minimal counter top real estate.

With a well-lathered stubble — especially since I took my time in lathering as I added and worked in small amounts of water — the shaving was easy, especially with the Stealth, a very fine slant. Three passes produce a great shave: comfortable, smooth shaving and a smooth finish.

A splash of Lilac & Fig aftershave, and I’m read for the day. I’m off to Home Depot for a half-sheet of rigid foam insulation. I awoke this morning with a new idea: remove the tempeh incubator’s lid flaps altogether and make what amounts to a plug for the top from gluing together two pieces of rigid foam insulation, one that fits snugly just inside the box top and the other just a bit larger to cap the edges. That will work better: better insulation and when I remove the top, easier access to the box. (The flaps kept getting in the way.)  Home Depot sells such foam insulation in sheets: 1″ x 2′ x 8′. You cut it with a knife. I’ll buy one of those, cut it in half to transport it, and then make the lid with plenty left over for other projects (gift tempeh incubators?).

Written by LeisureGuy

21 October 2020 at 8:35 am

Posted in Shaving

6 Responses

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  1. Michael, I have the soap (and the AS) shown in the picture. I liked the soap initially, but it doesn’t seem to lather as easily as it did when I first got it. The soap seems to be “drier.” (I face lather with a badger brush in hard water.)

    I’m not quite sure what you’re saying. Dapper Doc’s might take a little more water to get the perfect on-the-face lather? Have you noticed the product becoming drier and more thirsty?

    I plan to use it tomorrow morning, and I’ll incorporate any suggestions from you.

    Steve Riehle

    21 October 2020 at 11:25 am

  2. I haven’t notice the change but I use so many soaps that it’s hard to keep track. If you have hard water, though, it might be a good idea to clean your brush if you’ve done that recently. Just as on a razor, hard-water deposits can build up on a brush. I discuss brush cleaning in the Guide, as you probably know.

    I suggest loading the brush well, then after coating your face, working in a bit more water as I describe in the post. You might also try softening your shaving water in the sink as I’ve previously described.

    LeisureGuy

    21 October 2020 at 11:52 am

  3. When you are finished with the shave do you leave the lid off the soap container for a while to let it dry out a bit? Also, how are you storing your shaving items? I’m also living in an apartment with limited storage space. I purchased a couple spice racks from Wayfair and they’re adequate, but just barely so.

    George P.

    22 October 2020 at 6:21 am

  4. I cleaned the brush and noticed a small improvement in face lathering this morning. Thanx for the suggestion.

    Steve Riehle

    22 October 2020 at 7:58 am

  5. @ George P: Since my brush is just damp when I start loading the brush, and I add water only as needed to do the loading (because some soaps require just a bit more water — often a soap containing clay will need some extra water), there is not so much water in the tub. I replace the lid after the shave unless the soap maker has specifically said not to. (Martin de Candre says the lid is only for shipment and when the soap is iin use the lid can be discarded.) Some soaps (the 25% Asses’ Milk shaving soap from France) lose their mojo if the lid’s not replaced (or so a reader reported).

    Even with replacing the lid, I’ve noticed that some seldom-used soaps have become a little dry over the years, but they still work fine.

    Years ago The Eldest gave me a set of shelves for shaving soaps, which you can see in the first photo in this post. The shelves are adjustable in height, and the maker let you specify the width and height of the unit. I cannot right now find the maker’s name, but model-car shelving might be one option. The shelves can be set at different heights.

    The photos were taken in an apartment where I had a lot more bathroom counter space than in my current apartment. In my current apartment, the counter top is about 4″ wide on either side of the lavatory, so the soap rack stands on top of my dresser (not in the bathroom) and the razors are laid out around it in a little razor village. The two spice racks are mounted on the bathroom wall, using those 3-M velcro peel-off picture hangers so no wall damage.

    LeisureGuy

    22 October 2020 at 9:21 am

  6. @ Steve: Cleaning the brush seems to be the right direction to go. You might look for specifically at the cleaning ideas posted at http://www.emsplace.comhere’s one approach. Note the use of a mild vinegar solution to strip off calcium deposits. Rinse out the vinegar well.

    LeisureGuy

    22 October 2020 at 9:24 am


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