Later On

A blog written for those whose interests more or less match mine.

A thought about the Schwarzenegger video

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After sleeping on it, I had a few thoughts on Arnold Schwarzenegger’s video that I blogged yesterday. Let me quote some of what he said:

 I was born in 1947, two years after the Second World War. Growing up, I was surrounded by broken men drinking away their guilt over their participation in the most evil regime in history.

My father would come home drunk once or twice a week, and he would scream, and hit us, and scare my mother. I didn’t hold him totally responsible because our neighbor was doing the same thing to his family, and so was the next neighbor over.

I heard it with my own ears and saw it with my own eyes. They were in physical pain from the shrapnel in their bodies and in emotional pain for what they saw or did. It all started with lies, and lies, and lies, and intolerance.

It struck me that those insights into the reasons for his father’s behavior are not the insights of Arnold had when he was a child, being abused (physically, emotionally, and psychologically). Children have little experience or knowledge, so they tend to accept that what happens to them is just the way things are — especially if the same thing is happening in the houses of neighbors.

I think Schwarzenegger’s description of the causes of his father’s behavior reflects an understanding that came much later. I strongly suspect Schwarzeneger came to see that explanation through some extended psychotherapy and counseling, probably undertaken to examine and understand his own behavior and feelings. Psychotherapy generally includes a look back at one’s childhood family environment since that influences and shapes one’s worldview and behavior strategies. A better, deeper understanding of what was really going on in the family at the time — what was causing the behavior one saw — can help a lot in untying any psychic knots causing current problems for the adult that child became.

The statements I quote above strike me as realizations that were facilitated by a good therapist — for example, the realization that his father was not “evil,” but was acting as he did because he did know how else to deal with what had happened to him and what he had done.

Obviously, I have no direct knowledge, but I’ve done some therapy myself, and that reading certainly is consistent with my experience.

Written by LeisureGuy

11 January 2021 at 9:40 am

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