Later On

A blog written for those whose interests more or less match mine.

Archive for June 11th, 2021

Free lithium from seawater

leave a comment »

Mining.com has an interesting article. The lithium is free because the by-products pay for the process.

Researchers at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology developed what they believe is an economically viable system to extract high-purity lithium from seawater.

Previous efforts to tease lithium from the mixture the metal makes together with sodium, magnesium and potassium in seawater yielded very little. Although the liquid contains 5,000 times more lithium than what can be found on land, it is present at extremely low concentrations of about 0.2 parts per million (ppmTo address this issue, the team led by Zhiping Lai tried a method that had never been used before to extract lithium ions. They employed an electrochemical cell containing a ceramic membrane made from lithium lanthanum titanium oxide (LLTO).

The cell itself, on the other hand, contains three compartments. Seawater flows into a central feed chamber, where positive lithium ions pass through the LLTO membrane into a side compartment that contains a buffer solution and a copper cathode coated with platinum and ruthenium. At the same time, negative ions exit the feed chamber through a standard anion exchange membrane, passing into a third compartment containing a sodium chloride solution and a platinum-ruthenium anode.

Lai and his group tested the system using seawater from the Red Sea. At a voltage of 3.25V, the cell generates hydrogen gas at the cathode and chlorine gas at the anode. This drives the transport of lithium through the LLTO membrane, where it accumulates in the side-chamber. This lithium-enriched water then becomes the feedstock for four more cycles of processing, eventually reaching a concentration of more than 9,000 ppm.

To make the final product pure enough so that it meets battery manufacturers’ requirements, the scientists then  . . .

Continue reading.

Concluding paragraph:

According to the researchers, the cell will probably need $5 of electricity to extract 1 kilogram of lithium from seawater. This means that the value of hydrogen and chlorine produced by the cell would end up offsetting the cost of power, and residual seawater could also be used in desalination plants to provide freshwater.

Written by Leisureguy

11 June 2021 at 9:31 pm

23 Emotions People Feel But Can’t Explain

leave a comment »

Seen on Facebook and credited to tai-korczak:

1. Sonder: The realization that each passerby has a life as vivid and complex as your own.
2. Opia: The ambiguous intensity of Looking someone in the eye, which can feel simultaneously invasive and vulnerable.
3. Monachopsis: The subtle but persistent feeling of being out of place.
4. Enouement: The bittersweetness of having arrived in the future, seeing how things turn out, but not being able to tell your past self.
5. Vellichor: The strange wistfulness of used bookshops.
6. Rubatosis: The unsettling awareness of your own heartbeat.
7. Kenopsia: The eerie, forlorn atmosphere of a place that is usually bustling with people but is now abandoned and quiet.
8. Mauerbauertraurigkeit: The inexplicable urge to push people away, even close friends who you really like.
9. Jouska: A hypothetical conversation that you compulsively play out in your head.
10. Chrysalism: The amniotic tranquility of being indoors during a thunderstorm.
11. Vemödalen: The frustration of photographic something amazing when thousands of identical photos already exist.
12. Anecdoche: A conversation in which everyone is talking, but nobody is listening
13. Ellipsism: A sadness that you’ll never be able to know how history will turn out.
14. Kuebiko: A state of exhaustion inspired by acts of senseless violence.
15. Lachesism: The desire to be struck by disaster – to survive a plane crash, or to lose everything in a fire.
16. Exulansis: The tendency to give up trying to talk about an experience because people are unable to relate to it.
17. Adronitis: Frustration with how long it takes to get to know someone.
18. Rückkehrunruhe: The feeling of returning home after an immersive trip only to find it fading rapidly from your awareness.
19. Nodus Tollens: The realization that the plot of your life doesn’t make sense to you anymore.
20. Onism: The frustration of being stuck in just one body, that inhabits only one place at a time.
21. Liberosis: The desire to care less about things.
22. Altschmerz: Weariness with the same old issues that you’ve always had – the same boring flaws and anxieties that you’ve been gnawing on for years.
23. Occhiolism: The awareness of the smallness of your perspective.

I don’t have a word for it, but I occasionally get an odd feeling from the realization that, no matter what I do or how I live or what I read or eat or see or hear, I will have experienced only a tiny sliver of what humans experience.

Written by Leisureguy

11 June 2021 at 8:30 pm

Posted in Daily life

5460 steps and black beans cooking for tempeh

leave a comment »

Photos from today’s walk. As usual, click a photo to get a slide show, right-click a photo in the slide show to open in a new tab, and click that to enlarge.

I am cooking the black beans for the next batch of tempeh. The black rice that will be combined with the beans is already cooked and waiting. I plan to use some of the black-bean-and-black-rice tempeh to make tempeh chili, since tempeh works very well in chili.

At right is a piece cut from the above batch of tempeh — the first batch where I knew exactly what to do and why. (The photo looks a lot like a candy bar, doesn’t it? But those are soybeans, not peanuts.)

The short, soft fuzz is like the covering you see on Camembert, though the fungus on tempeh is Rhizopus oligosporus, and the fungus on Camembert (and Brie) is Penicillium camemberti. In either case, beans or cheese, the fungus colony forms a soft white crust. The job of Rhizopus, however, differs from that of Penicillium: the fluffy, white mycelium of Rhizopus welds the together beans to create an edible “cake.”

The fungus is why tempeh is more nutritious than edamame: with tempeh, you consume both the bean and the fungus mycelium. Note the difference between Rhizopus and the fungi we eat as mushrooms. When you eat mushrooms, you eat the spore-bearing bodies of the mycelium and don’t even see the mycelium, the actual fungus of which the mushroom is merely the “fruit” that bears the spores. In the case of mushrooms, the mycelium remains hidden underground — but when you eat tempeh, you eat the mycelium itself.

The Rhizopus sporing bodies don’t even appear if the tempeh maker knows what he’s doing (as I now do). They form when the tempeh is incubated at too high a temperature. Though edible, their appearance (black or dark gray) is off-putting to some. To prevent sporing, keep the incubation temperature at around 77ºF (25ºC) once the tempeh fungus colony is established. In the photo of the sample above, the snow-white mycelium is clearly visible.

 

Written by Leisureguy

11 June 2021 at 7:48 pm

Chayote squash and bitter melon, with onion, garlic, and turmeric

leave a comment »

I needed to cook Other Vegetables and thought I would also include a brick of frozen spinach. Given the liquid content, I decided to use my 4-qt All-Clad Stainless sauté pan (the d3; I don’t much like the d5: very heavy and IMO one aluminum core is plenty).

• about 1 1/2 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
• 2 bunches scallions, chopped
• 1 shallot, chopped (I found in the allium basket)
• 1/2 large red onion, chopped
• good pinch of Crystal kosher salt
• about 1.5-2 Tbsp freshly ground black pepper (because of turmeric)

It turned out that a setting of 3 was fine on my Max Burton 18XL induction burner. After the onions had cook a while, I added:

• cloves from 1 head garlic, chopped small and allowed to rest
• 2 good-sized turmeric roots, chopped small (I don’t attempt to peel them)

At that point I took the photo at the right. I cooked it for a minute or two, stirring with a wood spatula, then added:

• 1 chayote squash, diced
• 1 bitter melon, quartered lengthwise, then cut across
• about 10 medium domestic white mushrooms, sliced

The bitter melon I used is at the top of the first photo at the link above: the common Chinese bitter melon.

I let the veggies cook for a while, stirring from time to time, then after the mushrooms started to release their liquid, I added:

• 5 dried chipotles, cut up with kitchen shears
• about 1/4-1/3 cup Chinkiang vinegar (black vinegar)
• good splash Eden Organics shoyu sauce
• good splash Eden Organics mirin
• good splash yuzu ponzu sauce

I cooked that briefly, stirring, then added:

• 300g block of frozen spinach

I covered the pan and simmered at setting 1 for about 15 minutes, then went into break up the block of spinach. It was simmering briskly and looking a little dry, so I added:

• 1/4-1/3 cup Shaoxing wine (sherry would do, but that’s what I had)

And I changed the setting to 190ºF and set the timer for 15 minutes more. Photo below is right after I added the wine. I had though about including some diced tempeh, but I decided I’ll serve it over diced tempeh (perhaps with a little toasted sesame oil to top it).

I am soon going to make tempeh chili, probably with the new batch of tempeh I’ll start tonight: black bean and black rice combined — 2 cups uncooked black beans, 1 cup uncooked black rice. I’ve already cooked the rice; the beans still are soaking.

Written by Leisureguy

11 June 2021 at 4:39 pm

A guy deliberately jumps from a plane at 25,000 feet (762,000 cm) with no parachute — as a stunt

leave a comment »

I doubt that anyone could convince me to do this. Talk about jumping out of perfectly good airplane — at a height of 4 3/4 miles…

Written by Leisureguy

11 June 2021 at 3:33 pm

Posted in Daily life, Video

Simone Biles in Extreme Slow Motion

leave a comment »

To us spectators, her moves flash by like lightening, but I’m wondering whether, in her subjective perception, they are somewhat slower, giving her time to exercise conscious control. Perhaps she (subjectively) is perceiving the move in the direction this video shows (though not so slowly, I imagine).

Written by Leisureguy

11 June 2021 at 3:25 pm

Posted in Daily life, Video

Tagged with

Google AI beats humans at designing computer chips

leave a comment »

Some science fiction uses the Singularity as a theme — the Singularity being the point at which AI becomes conscious and self-directed, iterating improvements and gains of function to the point it quickly outstrips humanity (cf. the Singularity trilogy — Singularity Sky, Iron Sunrise, and Accelerando, by Charles Stross). The key moment is when AI begins enhancing its own technology — like, say, around now. From Nature, a podcast:

Working out where to place the billions of components that a modern computer chip needs can take human designers months and, despite decades of research, has defied automation. Now, Google researchers have developed a machine-learning algorithm that does the job in a fraction of the time and is already helping to design their next generation of artifical-intelligence processors.

Podcast 28 minutes

Only the first 7 minutes are about how AI is now designing the chips for the next generation of AI — that is, designing improved descendants of itself. And those descendants will be able to do an even better job of designing improvements. It strikes me as somewhat like regenerative feedback. And what could possibly go wrong with that process? What’s the worst that could happen, eh?

Written by Leisureguy

11 June 2021 at 3:14 pm

Koch-and-switch

leave a comment »

Judd Legum writes in Popular Information:

About seven months ago, billionaire businessman Charles Koch’s smiling face was in the pages of the Wall Street Journal. The 85-year-old Koch had spent decades funding a vast network of far-right causes, including the Tea Party, the movement which laid the groundwork for Donald Trump’s ascension to the presidency.

Koch said his prior work was a mistake. He vowed that, from now on, he would eschew partisanship and focus on “building bridges across ideological divides.”

Koch’s feature in the Wall Street Journal was part of a broader rebranding effort that coincided with the release of a new book:

Mr. Koch said he has since come to regret his partisanship, which he says badly deepened divisions. “Boy, did we screw up!” he writes in his new book. “What a mess!”

In a separate interview with the Washington Post that was released the same day, Koch congratulated Biden and said he wanted to “work together” with the new Democratic president on “as many issues as possible.”

We’ve got people so hyped on politics now that it seems like they think that’s all there is. You know, ‘If the other side wins, it’ll ruin the country and destroy us forever.’ Both sides are saying that, and feel that, and think this is the most important thing. Well, it is important, but it isn’t going to make any difference unless we all learn to work together and help each other and move toward a society of equal rights and mutual benefit.

Koch said he regretted hiring “ex-Republican operatives” and then “doing nothing” as they engaged in bare-knuckled political combat. Koch insisted that things would be different moving forward. “Let’s get together and make that happen so we can start helping each other, rather than hurting each other,” Koch said.

In the seven months since those interviews, however, Koch has deployed the full resources of his political network to try to stymie virtually every aspect of Biden’s agenda.

Most recently, one of Koch’s primary political organizations, Americans for Prosperity, has pressured Senator Joe Manchin (D-WV) to block various priorities of the Biden administration. CNBC reports that Americans for Prosperity has created ads, a video, and a website targeting Manchin. The website calls for Manchin to block a public option for Obamacare, a minimum wage increase, an infrastructure bill, and the For The People Act.

The effort appears to be working, as Manchin announced his opposition to the For The People Act in an op-ed on Sunday. But the campaign targeting Manchin is just one aspect of Koch’s multi-faceted attack on the Biden presidency.

Americans for Prosperity also . . .

Continue reading. There’s much more. I find that Popular Information has a lot of good content, though I don’t that often quote it in the blog. But I do read it and find it worthwhile.

Written by Leisureguy

11 June 2021 at 2:03 pm

A Friday feel-good story: The Raptors’ superfan inducted into the NBA Hall of Fame

leave a comment »

Snigdha Bansal reports in Vice:

Two years ago, as the Canadian professional basketball team, Toronto Raptors, headed into their first ever National Basketball Association (NBA) finals, all eyes weren’t just on the team, but also on their fans who’d waited almost 25 years for this moment.

Perhaps the most notable of them was Navdeep Bhatia, a Canadian businessman of Indian origin, popularly known as Nav, or the Raptors’ “superfan.” When the Raptors beat the Milwaukee Bucks to secure their place in the final, a Bucks fan referred to Bhatia as an “annoying Raptors fan” and a “fat Indian guy with the underwear on his head” in a tweet.

“What I wear on my head isn’t underwear,” Bhatia, who migrated to Canada from India in 1984 to escape the Sikh genocide, tells VICE. “But he was 50 percent right – I am fat.”

Perhaps it is this wit and ability to take things in stride that made him take the miffed Bucks fan and his son out for a meal, instead of adding to the outrage against the man that made the racist tweet. They’re now “the best of friends.”

This incident wasn’t the first time Bhatia was targeted for his turban. Having returned to India in 1982 with a degree in mechanical engineering from California State University in Los Angeles, he was looking to start a business when the anti-Sikh riots broke out.

“At that time, they were singling us out because of our turbans – cutting our hair off on the street, putting burning tires on our heads. When I escaped to Canada, I felt like I was in the safest country in the world,” he says.

But his struggles were far from over. After working many odd jobs, including janitorial and landscaping work, Bhatia was hired as a car salesman. On his first day, many people refused to work with him. Not one to get fazed easily, he saw it as an opportunity to prove himself and change people’s perception of him.

“In my first three months there, I sold 127 cars. It was a record then, and it is a record today,” he says. The achievement earned him a swift promotion. Today, the Mississauga-based businessman runs car dealerships in both Mississauga and Rexdale, the branch where he started his journey. . .

Continue reading. There’s more, and it’s heart-warming.

Written by Leisureguy

11 June 2021 at 1:07 pm

Posted in Daily life, Games

Seemingly normal: Profile of one insurrectionist — a geophysicist who seriously wounded a defenseless Capitol police officer

leave a comment »

Melanie Warner reports in Politico:

The text message showed up on John Bergman’s phone in late January. Sent to him by a former work colleague, it came with the question “Have you seen this??” and linked to an article and video from a news channel. Bergman pressed play.

It was a scene from the Capitol riots on January 6. Amid a throng of rioters outside the building’s western terrace tunnel was a figure wearing a tan Carhartt jacket, teal backpack, steel-toed boots and black tactical helmet. The article identified the man as Bergman’s longtime friend, Jeffrey Sabol. In the video, Sabol vaulted over a railing and appeared to drag a defenseless cop down a set of stairs.

Bergman could barely fathom what he was seeing. He had worked with Sabol for a decade and had known him for 18 years. “I’ve always revered Jeff as one of the most intelligent, capable, thoughtful, helping people,” Bergman says. “We had just spoken a few weeks earlier, and next thing I know he’s in Washington, D.C., doing this crazy thing.”

Sabol, 51, is a geophysicist from Kittredge, Colorado, a small town in the mountains outside Denver. In the weeks after the insurrection, he became one of the approximately 465 people charged so far for their participation in the January 6 insurrection. Sabol faces eight counts, several of them felonies, including the assault of police officers. He and four other defendants named in the same indictment are accused of participating in some of the day’s worst violence, which took place around 4:30 p.m. and resulted in several officers being stripped of their protective gear, dragged, stomped on, and attacked with crutches and a flagpole. [Politico article here includes a video of Sabol in action during the insurrection. – LG]

According to the indictment, Sabol wrested a baton from a second D.C. police officer who had been knocked down by another rioter outside the Capitol’s western terrace entrance, which would be the site of Joe Biden’s inauguration two weeks later. The officer later needed staples to close a wound on his head. Before being dragged into the mob by Sabol and others, prosecutors say, these officers had tried to reach a woman who died amid the throng (the D.C. medical examiner declared her death an amphetamine overdose). Images published in the government’s criminal complaint against Sabol show the woman lying on the ground at the top of the stairs wearing jeans and a black hooded sweatshirt, while Sabol and other men clash with police above her.

Sabol, who is divorced and has three teenagers back home in Colorado, also seems to appear in a YouTube video shot about two hours earlier and unearthed by a Twitter user who is part of a group of self-styled “sedition hunters.” In it, Sabol, known to the sedition hunters as #OrangeNTeal because of his highly identifiable jacket and backpack, runs headfirst into a row of officers trying to hold the line and prevent rioters from breaching the west steps of the Capitol.

Denied bail, Sabol is now locked in a cell at the Washington, D.C., Correctional Treatment Facility awaiting trial, deemed by a judge to be the “epitome of a flight risk” because of what he did after the riots. Unlike defendants who posted about their Capitol exploits on social media, Sabol immediately seemed to have grasped the gravity of his post-January 6 predicament. Back home in Colorado, he destroyed several electronic devices in his microwave and instructed friends to delete anything he had sent them, according to Sabol’s own statements to investigators. Several days later, he arrived at Logan Airport in Boston with a ticket to Zurich, Switzerland. Worried he had been recognized, he never got on the plane. Instead, he rented a car and drove to New York state, eventually ending up in a suburb of New York City. At some point along the way, he tossed his phone off a bridge and grew so distraught that he attempted to take his own life by slashing his wrists and thighs, his criminal complaint states.

“I’ve really been struggling with this, that my bro tried to kill himself,” Bergman says, his voice cracking with emotion. “It scared the shit out of me.”

Sabol’s actions on January 6 and the days afterward have left many in his life confused and grappling for answers. How did a highly educated, middle-aged man with so much to lose participate in what FBI director Christopher Wray called “domestic terrorism,” and then try to kill himself? How did someone with strong views about government overreach, but also plenty of friends and neighbors outside his political bubble, end up on the steps of the Capitol, in attempt to stop the certification of the 2020 presidential election results?

In some ways, Sabol’s radicalization mirrors that of other insurrectionists, a group that collectively has put a new face on American extremism. While many of those arrested for political terrorism in recent decades have been young, underemployed and socially isolated, the majority of the 465 (and counting) defendants in the Capitol attack are much like Sabol—older individuals, mostly white men, with well-established careers. A report by the University of Chicago’s Project on Security and Threats found that 67 percent of Capitol defendants are at least 35 years old, and 30 percent worked in white-collar jobs. Sabol was a geophysicist for an environmental services company. Other defendants include an investment manager at BB&T Bank (who died by suicide after his arrest), a State Department employee, an Olympic gold medalist swimmer, a real estate agent, many small-business owners, a doctor and an attorney. There are several dozen current or former military members, and at least 10 current or former law-enforcement officers. For all the public attention to right-wing groups and militias, just 12 percent of the defendants belonged to organized operations like the Proud Boys, Oath Keepers or boogaloo boys. The majority of the defendants, including Sabol, also came not from the heart of Trump country but from counties Biden won.

Based on multiple interviews with people who knew him, as well as extensive public records, Sabol’s story offers a vivid example of how “normal” this new form of radicalization might look from the outside—and how hard it can be to detect. Sabol, according to his ex-wife, was involved in volatile episodes at home, and court records show that he was charged with misdemeanor child abuse in 2016, for injuring his teenage son. Yet in letters sent to the court on his behalf, 30 friends, neighbors and family members, including Army officers and a Denver police sergeant, describe the man they know in glowing terms. The kind of guy who gives his jacket to an underdressed hiker and goes down a 14,000-foot mountain in a T-shirt. A guy who steps in to prevent altercations. A guy with a peace-sign tattoo on his back.

“We discussed all kinds of topics—parenting, religion, politics, relationships, work, hobbies, and life experiences. Never once did I detect any indication of him being a fanatic of any sort,” wrote a retired schoolteacher who volunteered with Sabol at a youth horse-riding organization nearly every Saturday for the past two years. “I can’t conceive of him being a danger to the community in any way.”

Nearly six months after the insurrection, hundreds of defendants are awaiting trial or plea deals as their cases move through the justice system. Sabol is among the approximately 50 who have been denied bail and are being held in jail in Washington, D.C., in their cells for nearly 20 hours a day due to Covid concerns. The Biden administration has taken a number of steps to begin to combat violent domestic extremism across different federal departments, even as Congress recently failed to agree to create a commission to study the events of January 6.

But the larger problem—of how so many Americans came to see violence or forced entry into a government building as their best options, and whether it could happen again—isn’t at all resolved. Millions of Americans continue to hold some of the same beliefs that propelled Sabol to the Capitol. Experts say the new wave of right-wing extremism on display at the Capitol is both unprecedented in its size and scope—and far more challenging to track and root out. Understanding Jeffrey Sabol’s transformation reveals how radicalization can happen under the radar, while offering lessons for those who want to combat it going forward: about how personal challenges can collide with political messages, and how a person’s job, education level, community and even their social media profile aren’t reliable predictors of extremist behavior. Thousands of people descended on the Capitol terrace, with thousands of individual routes taken to get there.

Where will they go next? “What’s concerning is that many did not see January 6 as the end of something,” says Susan Corke, the director of the Intelligence Project at the Southern Poverty Law Center. “They saw it as the beginning.” . . .

Continue reading. There’s much more, and it indicates that there’s trouble ahead.

Written by Leisureguy

11 June 2021 at 12:11 pm

Type 2 diabetics: Diet modification PLUS walking has helped me

with 2 comments

Some things I have to relearn. I have type 2 diabetes, and I can keep it under control if I do the right things. I found that modifying my diet was necessary but not sufficient. Getting good control also requires exercise (Nordic walking for me), and I believe cardio exercise — what Kenneth Cooper called “aerobics” — is the best approach from a health perspective, though certainly resistance training (for muscular strength) is a good complement.

I first changed my diet to a low-carb high-fat diet — not excessively high fat, just enough additional fat to make up the calories lost by reducing carbs, the idea being not to increase the protein level but keep it moderate. So if net carbs are reduced by 100g, fat is increased by 45g — the same caloric amount.

But after I learned of various health risks of a low-carb diet and that saturated fat increases insulin resistance, I took another look at my diet and did more reading and research. It was then that I read Michael Greger’s How Not to Die, which discusses what we know about the relationship between diet and chronic diseases from scientific studies. In Part 2 of the book, he recommends a diet based on that research, and that’s the diet I adopted.

His recommended diet is what I call a “whole-food plant-only” diet, though I also include fungi (as pesudo-plants). That means no meat, fish, dairy, or eggs (though on rare occasions I’ll have a modest amount for one meal). No meat, fish, dairy, or eggs is the same as a vegan diet, but the other restriction — whole foods — means that I avoid refined foods (refined sugar, flour, fruit juice — whole fruit is fine — and so on) and also avoid highly processed foods that are manufactured using industrial methods from refined ingredients and various additives (preservatives, coloring, flavors, and so on — usually with substantial salt and refined sugar). The vegan diet does not preclude those, though of course some vegans do avoid them and in fact follow a whole-food plant-only diet, even though the vegan diet per se does allow for refined and highly processed foods so long as they are free of animal products — and indeed a supermarket will often have a fairly large section of highly processed vegan food products.

My blood glucose readings improved remarkably on that diet, and when I also included exercise (Nordic walking is what I like), things got even better. But winter came, walking faded, and my fasting blood glucose readings slowly drifted up — my 90-day average right now is 6.4 mmol/L (115 mg/dL).

This past Sunday I started walking again.  My daily step counts starting last Sunday June 6: 2288, 2861, 3995, 4564, 4660, and 5527 steps per day — and my fasting blood glucose readings for the following days, starting Monday: 6.3, 6.3, 6.5, 5.4, 5.3, and 5.2 mmol/L. That is pretty convincing to me. Walking did seem to make a big difference (after a startup lag). The last three readings — 5.4 mmol/L = 97 mg/dL, 5.3 mmol/L = 95 mg/dL, and 5.2 mmol/L = 94 mg/dL — are well within “normal.” (“Pre-diabetic” starts at 5.6 mmol/L (101 mg/dL), and 7.0 mmol/L (126 mg/dL) is the starting point for “diabetic.” Update: See graph below, which I’ll continue to update for a while.

It seems that after four days of walking (gradually increasing the distance), the exercise effect kicked in and — with my diet staying constant — my fasting blood glucose dropped back to where it should be. I see I must walk.

Luckily, I live in a good neighborhood for walking. And it’s also lucky I enjoy the foods included in my diet (and enjoy cooking).

Written by Leisureguy

11 June 2021 at 11:05 am

Pine, cedar, and cinnawood

leave a comment »

Mike’s Natural soaps seem to go for a light touch on fragrance — pleasant but modest and unassuming. Still, the lather is very good, usually requiring a dab or two of additional water during loading, probably due to the clay:

Distilled water; saponified tallow (beef) and stearic acid; vegetable glycerin; saponified kokum butter, avocado oil, and shea butter; lanolin, fragrance and/or essential oil(s); saponified coconut oil; kaolin clay, vitamin E.

Phoenix Artisan’s Starcraft is a 24mm brush, a little on the large side for me, but it works well and I like the retro look. Yaqi’s double-open comb head is a marvel, routinely delivering a comfortable shave with an exceptionally smooth result.

A splash from a Chiseled Face sample of Cinnawood Boroka, which smells exactly as you would expect, and I’m ready for the end of the week (though not the weekend — that will require one additional shave).

Written by Leisureguy

11 June 2021 at 9:28 am

Posted in Shaving

%d bloggers like this: