Later On

A blog written for those whose interests more or less match mine.

Archive for the ‘Jazz’ Category

Great music from yesteryear: Jam session Jazz at the Philharmonic, 1967

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Written by LeisureGuy

3 August 2020 at 9:06 am

Posted in Jazz, Video

Solo Charlesto to “Don’t Forget to Mess Around” with Louis Armstrong

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My kind of music.

Written by LeisureGuy

9 July 2020 at 5:06 pm

Posted in Jazz, Video

The worst jazz solo of all time turns out to have some interesting jazz history

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FWIW, I love Illinois Jacquet‘s work — lyrical swing.

Here’s Illinois Jacquet — a big sound:

 

Written by LeisureGuy

20 June 2020 at 11:28 am

Posted in Jazz, Video

Modal jazz and “Kind of Blue”

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Written by LeisureGuy

20 June 2020 at 11:21 am

Posted in Jazz, Video

Modes in music, explained by Leonard Bernstain

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And now listen to this Nancy Willson program on “Kind of Blue” by Miles Davis.

Written by LeisureGuy

12 June 2020 at 8:46 pm

Posted in Jazz, Music, Video

Dynamic Women of Early Jazz and Classic Blues

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Excellent article by David Radlauer, with many links. Just one of many ncluded in the article. Another, featuring Ginger Smock.

 

Written by LeisureGuy

21 May 2020 at 9:06 pm

Posted in Jazz

And, of course, this for today (5/4)

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I got to see the Dave Brubeck Quartet in concert once, in Hancher Auditorium at the University of Iowa in Iowa City.

Written by LeisureGuy

4 May 2020 at 8:56 am

Posted in Daily life, Jazz, Video

Online exhibits from Stanford University Libraries

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It turns out that there are many online exhibits to peruse.

Written by LeisureGuy

23 April 2020 at 1:45 pm

More great jazz, with a focus on the East Bay Revival

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I exchanged emails with Dave Redlauer, the man behind Jazz Rhythms, and he pointed to the Stanford University Libraries online collection of the San Francisco Traditional Jazz Foundation. Dave was responsible for the section The East Bay Sound. (Full disclosure: The Wife works for Stanford Public Libraries.)

Watch, for example, The Great Revival, which gives a brief history of the Lu Watters and Turk Murphy story. I like the Turk Murphy band a lot and had quite a collection, and I particularly liked vocalist that sang briefly with him: Claire Austin. She was a walk-on — just asked if she could single a number with the band. She was really good, and her training, as I recall reading, was singing Billie Holiday songs while ironing. She eventually decided not to continue with the band — she lived in Sacramento, so it was quite a drive to be with the band in San Francisco — and returned to be a housewife.

But that apparently was not the end of the story. I was searching to see if one of her songs I particularly like, “Oh Daddy,” was available online, and I found that she has a few albums on Spotify, including that song. She’s also well represented on YouTube. This video is sorely lacking in credits in the notes, but this was recorded with the Turk Murphy (note tuba, for example).

Dave wrote:

Here’s a behind the scenes peek.  The website is way overdue for updating.  I’ve been building it out since before 2000, but in real earnest since about 2010.

The last few years most of my energy has been going into the articles I’m publishing at Syncopated Times, Dagogo and other publications both online and print — about 100 during the last decade.  Those narratives are based on some of my best programs and pages — oftentimes highlighted with audio clips from the relevant shows.

Then I recycle that writing back onto the webpages.  Most recently Ellington Live, James P. Johnson, Billie Holiday, Buddy Bolden, Bunny Berigan, Buck Clayton, Frank Goudie in Paris 1924-39, and so forth.  The web pages are more modular and non-linear, trying to catch the eye or ear with episodic chunks or features.  And the pages serve as a showcase for the complete radio programs.  But in the end pages are more compete and in-depth that the articles.

Keeping a website of this size is like tending a garden — seasonal weeding, pruning and nutrition; finding areas that need reorganization or overhaul.  Frankly, some of the writing goes back decades and is not up to my current standards, although all the radio programs are.

Most of the syndicated programs were produced between about 1998-2010 (excluding the vintage pre-syndication stuff from the local series on KALW).  They are still being broadcast on a handful of, mostly, low-power or online affiliates.   Even when I had NPR stations, it was no more than about a dozen at a time.

Lastly, the materials I’ve donated in a special collection at the Stanford Libraries archives [The Dave Radlauer Jazz Collection at Stanford Libraries — Braun Music Library – LG] cannot be referenced or accessed online . . . yet.  But I did contribute to Stanford’s public-facing interface for a related online collection of the San Francisco Traditional Jazz Foundation, the section and articles found under the heading The East Bay Sound.

Written by LeisureGuy

23 April 2020 at 12:36 pm

Posted in Jazz

Another discovery in the link list: Jazz Rhythm

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As I continue my housekeeping chore of weeding the link list and updating descriptions of the link I’m keeping (links A-M now completed), I rediscover some excellent sites I’ve left fallow for too long. Jazz Rhythm is a terrific site with a great jazz collection, available as audio with commentary, well-organized and with good articles.

Try it out. Worth a bookmark.

Written by LeisureGuy

23 April 2020 at 10:05 am

A Sunday morning treat

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Written by LeisureGuy

5 April 2020 at 8:36 am

Posted in Jazz, Video

Nancy Wilson: “The Very Thought of You”

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Written by LeisureGuy

25 March 2020 at 6:02 pm

Posted in Jazz, Video

Hand-washing technique with soap and water — and a better song

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Written by LeisureGuy

13 March 2020 at 2:01 pm

Posted in Daily life, Jazz, Medical, Memes

Centennial Songs podcast: “Hold That Tiger!”

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Written by LeisureGuy

8 March 2020 at 3:41 pm

Posted in Jazz

“Take Five”

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From a column in Open Culture worth reading:

Written by LeisureGuy

10 December 2019 at 3:48 pm

Posted in Jazz, Video

The Unexpected Joy of Repeat Experiences

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If I’ve enjoyed them a lot, I reread books and rewatch movies and relisten to music and repeat meals and drinks — and I would bet that you do as well. Revisiting the familiar can be very pleasurable and surprisingly often one discovers some new aspect of it. Leah Fessler comments in the NY Times on this pleasure:

Scrolling through Instagram can quickly convince you that everyone’s life is more interesting than yours. During a particularly adventurous week on Instagram Stories recently, I saw water skiing in Maui, hiking in Yosemite, and swimming with wild pigs in Bermuda. Wild pigs!

Impulsively, I started Googling flights to new places. Then I ordered pho from the same Vietnamese place I eat at every week and … felt bad about not trying somewhere new.

This fear of missing out is rooted in a common psychological tic: Evolutionarily, we’re disposed to find novel experiences more exciting and attention-grabbing than repeat experiences, according to research published in the Journal of Experimental Biology. It’s basically fight or flight psychology — our brains can’t process all the stimuli around us, so we evolved to pay attention to new, flashy, and potentially dangerous things more intently than familiar things, which we’ve seen enough to know they’re not dangerous. What’s more, words like “repetition” and “repetitiveness” — unlike “novelty” — tend to be associated with more negative emotions, said Michael Norton, a professor at Harvard Business School.

“Classic research shows that when we think about upcoming experiences, we think about variety,” said Mr. Norton, who specializes in consumer behavior. “If I ask you right now to select a yogurt for each day next week, you’ll pick your favorite flavor — say, blueberry — a few times, but you’ll mix in some strawberry and peach. Because who wants to eat that much blueberry yogurt? Over the longer term, though, as the original experience fades in time and memory, repetition can become more pleasurable.”

He added: “We’re simply more boring than we’d like to admit.”

Our obsession with novelty is also enhanced by the influencer and experience economies, which confer social status based on how many new things you can do, see and buy, as Leah Prinzivalli unpacks in a recent article documenting the rise of Instagram to-do lists. This can be emotionally and financially draining: Few of us have the time or money to regularly indulge new experiences, which can lead us to feel bad about our lives’ monotony. However, recent research published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology about repeat and novel experiences suggests we ought to reconsider how we digest those feelings of monotony.

This research centers on hedonic adaptation — when an identical stimulus provides less pleasure the more it’s consumed.

Some previous research has painted a negative picture of repeat experiences, citing that doing the same thing twice can feel inherently less valuable. But Ed O’Brien, a professor of behavioral science at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, wondered whether behavioral science misconstrued hedonic adaptation, and people actually underestimate how positively they react to repeat experiences. Many of us happily listen to our favorite song on repeat, he noted, or rewatch favorite movies and TV shows. This repetition was the whole point of purchasing music or film before the age of Spotify and Netflix. This conflict is why Mr. O’Brien launched a series of studies on the topic. . .

Continue reading.

Written by LeisureGuy

14 November 2019 at 9:45 am

What a difference a day makes—24 little hours (Tempeh division)

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The start:

After 24 little hours:

And here it is after 48 hours:

I will let it go another 3 hours, and then I need the oven, so I’m calling it done. The Eldest suggested an idea for part of this batch: chili. 🙂

Written by LeisureGuy

19 October 2019 at 2:33 pm

I fell down a jazz rabbit hole, and came up with Slam Stewart

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I had a lot of Slim and Slam recordings (Slim Gaillard and Slam Stewart). Here are a three Slam Stewart pieces that I like.

and

and

The first of these has this in notes:

RARE OLDIES SOUNDIES WITH MR SLAM STEWART & HIS TRIO ! Stewart was born in Englewood, New Jersey in 1914. While attending the Boston Conservatory, he heard Ray Perry singing along with his violin. This gave him the inspiration to follow suit with his bass. In 1937 Stewart teamed with Slim Gaillard to form the novelty jazz act Slim and Slam. The duo’s biggest hit was “Flat Foot Floogie (with a Floy Floy)” in 1938 (see 1938 in music). Stewart found regular session work throughout the 1940s with Lester Young, Fats Waller, Coleman Hawkins, Art Tatum, Johnny Guarnieri, Red Norvo, Don Byas, the Benny Goodman Sextet, Beryl Booker, and other jazz greats. One of the most famous sessions he played on took place in 1945, when Stewart played with Dizzy Gillespie’s group (which featured Charlie Parker). Out of those sessions came some of the classics of bebop such as “Groovin’ High” and “Dizzy Atmosphere.” Throughout the rest of his career, Stewart worked regularly and employed his unique and enjoyable bass-playing style. He died in 1987 in Binghamton, New York.

Written by LeisureGuy

13 September 2019 at 5:52 pm

Posted in Jazz, Video

Whistling as music

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and

And for some backstory on Geert Chartrou (and some amazing performances):

And a jazz whistler:

A better clip of him:

And this

Most of these are via this article. It has more. One interesting thing you see in various performances (e.g., in the CDZA clip) is that one does actually wet his whistle.

Here’s more Ron McCroby, whom I like a lot:

One more:

Written by LeisureGuy

13 September 2019 at 3:52 pm

Posted in Jazz, Music

Remembering “Time Out” by the Dave Brubeck Quartet

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This is via an Open Culture post that’s worth reading in its entirety.

Written by LeisureGuy

25 August 2019 at 4:43 pm

Posted in Jazz, Music, Video

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