Later On

A blog written for those whose interests more or less match mine.

Archive for the ‘Video’ Category

Ella Fitzgerald – All The Things You Are

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Written by Leisureguy

4 August 2021 at 5:58 pm

Posted in Art, Jazz, Music, Video

The Collatz Conjecture

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Written by Leisureguy

4 August 2021 at 12:21 pm

Posted in Math, Video

A randomized controlled trial investigates diet and psychological well-being.

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Written by Leisureguy

4 August 2021 at 12:06 pm

Nighthawks, by Edward Hopper: Great Art Explained

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Written by Leisureguy

27 July 2021 at 11:01 am

Posted in Art, Daily life, Video

Paris Sportif: The Contagious Attraction of Parkour

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I first encountered parkour in a Luc Besson movie, District 13 (from 2004, original title Banlieue 13), but it has a longer history, discussed by Macs Smith in an extract from his book Paris and the Parasite: Noise, Health, and Politics in the Media City published in The MIT Reader:

In a city fixated on public health and order, a viral extreme sport offers a challenge to the status quo.1955, Letterist International, a Paris-based group of avant-garde authors, artists, and urban theorists, published “Proposals for Rationally Improving the City of Paris.” The group, which would become better known as Situationist International, or SI, and play an important role in the May 1968 demonstrations, put forward wild suggestions for breaking the monotony of urban life. Some of these, like the call to abolish museums and distribute their masterpieces to nightclubs, were iconoclastic and anti-institutional, reflecting the group’s anarchic political leanings.

Others were less overtly political and testified to a thirst for excitement. To appeal to “spelunkers” and thrill-seekers, they called for Paris’s rooftops and metro tunnels to be opened up to exploration. The group believed that the mundaneness of urban life in the 1950s was integral to bourgeois capitalism. Boredom was part of how the government maintained order, and so a more equal city would necessarily have to be more frightening, more surprising, more fun.

SI disbanded in 1972, but its ideas about the links between emotion and urban politics have been influential. Among the best examples are the subcultures centered around urban thrill-seeking that exist today, like urban exploration (Urbex), rooftopping, and skywalking, all of which involve breaking into dangerous or forbidden zones of the city. The most famous inheritor to SI’s call to experience urban space differently is parkour, which was invented in the Paris suburb of Lisses in the 1980s. It was inspired by Hébertisme, a method of obstacle course training first introduced to the French Navy in 1910 by Georges Hébert. David Belle learned the principles of Hébertisme from his father, Raymond, who had been exposed to it at a military school in Vietnam. David, along with a friend, Sébastien Foucan, then adapted those principles, originally conceived for natural environments, to the suburban architecture of their surroundings.

Over time, parkour has incorporated techniques from tumbling, gymnastics, and capoeira, resulting in a striking blend of military power and balletic artistry. Parkour involves confronting an urban map with an embodied experience of urban space. It is often defined as moving from points A to B in the most efficient way possible, and parkour practitioners, called traceurs, often depict themselves as trailblazers identifying routes through the city that cartography does not capture. Traceurs sometimes evoke the fantasy of tracing a straight line on the map and finding a way to turn it into a path, although in practice, they more often work at a single point on the map — a park, a rooftop, an esplanade — and end a session back where they started.

Traceurs’ desire to rewrite the map is another thing they share with the Situationists, who liked to cut up maps and glue them back together to show the psychological distance between neighborhoods. But parkour distinguishes itself from SI through its use of video, which continues to be a point of debate within the practice. In the early 2000s, Sébastien Foucan reignited this debate when he broke away from Belle to pioneer his own version of the training system.

Foucan’s appearance in the 2003 documentary “Jump London” cemented “freerunning” as the name for this alternate practice, which put a greater emphasis on stylized movements. Foucan would go on to play a terrorist bomb-maker in Martin Campbell’s “Casino Royale,” leaping from cranes with Daniel Craig’s James Bond in pursuit. Some parkour purists see this as a degradation of the utilitarian roots of their training, and insist instead on a physio-spiritual discourse of communion with the environment, mastery of fear, and humility. They reject freerunning as a brash corruption of Hébert’s principles. The sociologist Jeffrey Kidder notes in his interviews with traceurs in Chicago that they dismiss participants who lack interest in serious rituals like safety, humility, and personal growth. They react negatively to media coverage that highlights parkour’s danger or assimilates it into adolescent rebellions like skateboarding, drug use, or loitering.

In my own email interview with the leaders of Parkour Paris, the official parkour organization of Paris, the same will to blame media is evident: “Parkour has been mediatized in ‘connotated’ films. The traceurs depicted in those fictions were friendly delinquents a bit like Robin Hood. Friendly, yes, but for the immense majority of people they were still delinquents from the banlieue,” they gripe. “It’s been very hard to shake that image.” . . .

Continue reading. There’s much more. And it includes this 50-minute video, Jump London:

Written by Leisureguy

27 July 2021 at 10:17 am

That’s why they call it “snooker”: O’Sullivan and Selby contest the deciding frame

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Tied 16-16 in a best out of 33 match, Selby and O’Sullivan throw snookers at each other with astonishing skill and finesse.

And as a bonus, here’s a video of Ronnie O’Sullivan making astounding comebacks from being very far down — for example, the first frame is O’Sullivan vs. Bingham and begins at the point where O’Sullivan has 1 point and Bingham has 67 points.

Written by Leisureguy

26 July 2021 at 12:12 pm

Posted in Games, Snooker, Video

Oscar Peterson – Boogie Blues Etude

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Written by Leisureguy

25 July 2021 at 7:12 am

Posted in Daily life, Jazz, Video

Ventriloquist gets a volunteer

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Written by Leisureguy

22 July 2021 at 12:15 pm

Posted in Humor, Video

Magnus Carlsen Crushed in 26 Seconds!!!

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Magnus Carlsen is world chess champion, and he is quickly defeated in this tournament game of bullet chess. In this game the time limit seems to have been 1 minute per player.

Written by Leisureguy

21 July 2021 at 3:25 pm

Posted in Chess, Games, Video

A good-news video for mushroom eaters

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Because I eat mushrooms frequently — multiple times a week — and because I often add two or three raw sliced domestic white mushrooms to a salad, I found this video a pleasure to watch. (I eat shiitake mushrooms only when cooked, BTW.)

Written by Leisureguy

14 July 2021 at 11:57 am

Computerized pool cue

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This cue would be no match for Efren Reyes in a pocket billiards game like 8-ball or 9-ball, but I found the design and building — and debugging — of it very interesting and even recreational.

Written by Leisureguy

14 July 2021 at 9:56 am

Superb break in 2020 Snooker Shoot Out

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Snooker Shoot Out is to snooker as blitz chess is to chess: a stripped-down, fast-paced game. From the Wikipedia article at the link, here are the rules:

  • Every frame lasts a maximum of 10 minutes.
  • There is a shot clock. For the first 5 minutes of the match, players have 15 seconds per shot, but for the last 5 minutes this is reduced to 10 seconds.[27] Prior to 2013, the shot clock was set at 20 seconds per shot for the first 5 minutes and 15 seconds for the last 5 minutes.[25] Failure to strike the cue ball within the time allowed results in a minimum 5 points penalty or the value of the ball ‘on’, whichever is greater. Prior to 2018, it was always a 5 points penalty.[28] In 2021, normal rules regarding foul points are used.
  • Players must hit a cushion (with any ball) or pot a ball with every shot.[27] Prior to 2013 either the cue ball or the object ball needed to hit a cushion.[25] Failure to do so results in a minimum 5 points penalty or the value of the ball ‘on’, whichever is greater. Prior to 2018, it was always a 5 points penalty.[28]
  • All fouls result in ball in hand.
  • Players ‘lag‘ for who breaks off.
  • In an event of a tie the blue ball shoot-out determines the winner. The blue ball is placed on its spot and the player can place the cue ball anywhere within the D before attempting to pot the blue (winner of lag decides who goes first). The blue ball must be potted directly, i.e. without a fluke.

And here’s an exceptional frame played by Chang Bingyu. You can see the countdown time on-screen as he makes each shot.

Written by Leisureguy

13 July 2021 at 10:42 am

Posted in Games, Snooker, Video

Ronnie O’Sullivan v. Neil Robertson in 2019 Tour Championship

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This game finds the two tied at 9-9. I wanted to show The Wife how snooker matches are lighted — by using a blue light on the audience, with white light on the players and table, the game is very much foregrounded in the video with the audience muted into background. Plus it’s a good game.

Written by Leisureguy

10 July 2021 at 11:42 am

Posted in Games, Snooker, Video

Broccoli to Counter the Effects of Air Pollution

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Note that broccoli sprouts are particularly powerful. Not all stores carry those, however. I mostly eat broccoli i its usual form.

And more on broccoli and how to cook it so its healthful qualities are preserved. (This doesn’t apply to broccoli sprouts, which are eaten raw.) I eat a fair amount of broccoli — steam it, refrigerate it, and eat it in salads — and I chop it before I steam it and let it sit for 45 minutes after being chopped before I steam it. Now I think I’ll use the mustard trick (or add diced fresh daikon radish) for the reasons discussed in the video. Good trick to know for frozen kale, too. Watch:

UPDATE

I would bet that “hack and hold” (or “whack and wait”) is important for all cruciferous vegetables. For cauliflower, for example:

How to Get the Greatest Benefit

To assure that the enzyme sulforaphane is created, eat cauliflower raw or utilize the “whack and wait” technique: chop the cauliflower and wait 40 minutes—enough time to produce the enzyme—which will then be heat stable. If there is no time, all is not lost! Just sprinkle your frozen or cooked cauliflower with a little dry mustard powder which also encourages the formation of sulforaphane. Steaming of cauliflower significantly improves the bile acid binding. 

The whack-and-wait method is also important for garlic, though in that case you need wait only 15 minutes after chopping it before using it in cooking.

 

Written by Leisureguy

9 July 2021 at 9:15 am

New use for shaving brush

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Written by Leisureguy

8 July 2021 at 2:18 pm

Plant-based-diet food tips

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Unless you eat only meat, eggs, dairy, and fish, you will find yourself eating vegetables and other plant-based foods, and this guy actually has some useful, interesting tips, plus he does show how a the foods on a plant-based diet can be tasty and intriguing.

However, he is a vegan, so he happily eats a certain amount of processed food (the pasta he likes, for example). Since I eat whole foods, I am not so inclined as he is to accept highly processed foods — for example, I prefer tempeh to tofu. And I am not so inclined to drink a smoothie — I’d rather eat the whole foods. (Chewing, for me, is not a problem.)

He does seem a little too excitable — I wish he’d turn down the enthusiasm and energy a few notches — but I understand that some believe that a high-pitch of excitement is required in videos (cf. fast-food commercials in which people are close to manic excitement over their hamburger). Still, I would like to say to him, “Cool your jets, man. Take a deep breath and calm down.”

Nonetheless, take a look at these three videos and see if you don’t find some tips you can use.

Written by Leisureguy

5 July 2021 at 6:39 pm

Michael Davis juggles at Ford Theater in the 1980’s

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Written by Leisureguy

3 July 2021 at 10:15 pm

Posted in Humor, Video

School of juvenile striped eel catfish in Jemeluk Bay

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Written by Leisureguy

3 July 2021 at 4:12 pm

Posted in Daily life, Video

A 3-minute neck exercise routine to improve flexibility

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This looks good to me.

Written by Leisureguy

3 July 2021 at 10:28 am

Sheep Herding in Yokneam

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Yokneam is in northern Israel.

Written by Leisureguy

2 July 2021 at 1:08 pm

Posted in Business, Daily life, Video

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