Later On

A blog written for those whose interests more or less match mine.

Posts Tagged ‘vitamin d

Vitamin D: low levels deadly

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I’ve beat the drum about the importance of vitamin D quite a bit. I take 3000 IU of vitamin D a day, plus I try to be outside occasionally. Generally speaking, Americans have low levels of vitamin D—down to subclinical deficiencies. Obviously, this doesn’t apply to everyone. People in the southern states—the belt from Florida across to southern California—who also work outdoors every day will have no problems with sufficient vitamin D. But if you live in the middle or northern belt of the US and/or work indoors, take care that you get sufficient vitamin D. Latest finding:

Researchers at Johns Hopkins are reporting what is believed to be the most conclusive evidence to date that inadequate levels of vitamin D, obtained from milk, fortified cereals and exposure to sunlight, lead to substantially increased risk of death. In a study set to appear in the Archives of Internal Medicine online Aug. 11, the Johns Hopkins team analyzed a diverse sample of 13,000 initially healthy men and women participating in an ongoing national health survey and compared the risk of death between those with the lowest blood levels of vitamin D to those with higher amounts. An unhealthy deficiency, experts say, is considered blood levels of 17.8 nanograms per milliliter or lower.

Of the 1,800 study participants known to have died by Dec. 31, 2000, nearly 700 died from some form of heart disease, with 400 of these being deficient in vitamin D. This translates overall to an estimated 26 percent increased risk of any death, though the number of deaths from heart disease alone was not large enough to meet scientific criteria to resolve that it was due to low vitamin D levels.

Yet, researchers say it does highlight a trend, with other studies linking shortages of vitamin D to increased rates of breast cancer and depression in the elderly. And earlier published findings by the team, from the same national study, have established a possible tie-in, showing an 80 percent increased risk of peripheral artery disease from vitamin D deficits.

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Written by Leisureguy

12 August 2008 at 8:23 am

Posted in Daily life, Health, Science

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Kids need more vitamin D

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Kids who are apparently healthy can still be deficient in vitamin D levels.

Many healthy infants and toddlers may have low levels of vitamin D, and about one-third of those appear to have some evidence of reduced bone mineral content on X-rays, according to a report in the June issue of Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. Reports of a resurgence of vitamin D deficiency and rickets, the resulting bone-weakening disease, have emerged in several states, according to background information in the article. Vitamin D deficiency also appears to be high in other countries, including Greece, China, Canada and England.

Catherine M. Gordon, M.D., M.Sc., and colleagues at Children’s Hospital Boston, studied 380 healthy children ages 8 months to 24 months who visited a primary care center for a physical examination between 2005 and 2007. Parents filled out a questionnaire regarding their nutritional intake and that of their children, and also reported on the use of vitamin D and other supplements, time spent outdoors, socioeconomic status and education level.

Among the 365 children for whom blood samples were available, 12.1 percent (44) had vitamin D deficiency, defined as 20 nanograms per milliliter of blood or less, and 40 percent (146) had levels below the accepted optimal level of 30 nanograms per milliliter. Breastfed infants who did not receive vitamin D and toddlers who drank less milk were at higher risk of deficiency (for each cup of milk toddlers drank per day, blood vitamin D level increased by 2.9 nanograms per milliliter).

Forty children of the 44 with vitamin D deficiency underwent X-rays of the wrist and knee. Thirteen (32.5 percent) had evidence of bone mineral loss, and three (7.5 percent) exhibited changes to their bones suggestive of rickets.

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Written by Leisureguy

6 June 2008 at 12:29 pm

Posted in Daily life, Food, Health

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Vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy

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I recently posted about a long-term study in Canada where pregnant women are getting 4,000 IU of vitamin D daily from supplements. Seems like a good idea. From an email:

In a hospital-based case-control study involving 25 newborns with acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI) and their mothers (study group), and 15 healthy age-matched newborns and their mothers (control group), results indicate that serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations in newborns may be inversely associated with the risk of ALRI, and positively associated with maternal serum 25(OH)D concentrations. The mean serum 25(OH)D concentrations in newborns and their mothers study group were significantly lower than those in newborns and their mothers in the control group. Additionally, a strong positive correlation was observed between maternal and newborn serum 25(OH)D concentrations. 87.5% of newborns and 67.5% of mothers had serum 25(OH)D concentrations lower than 20 ng/ml. Thus, the authors of this study conclude, “Our findings suggest that newborns with subclinical vitamin D deficiency may have an increased risk of suffering from ALRI. The strong positive corr elation between newborns’ and mothers’ 25(OH)D concentrations shows that adequate vitamin D supplementation of mothers should be emphasized during pregnancy especially in winter months.”

“Association of subclinical vitamin D deficiency in newborns with acute lower respiratory infection and their mothers,” Karatekin G, Kaya A, et al, Eur J Clin Nutr, 2007 Nov 21; [Epub ahead of print]. (Address: Professor G. Karatekin, Dep’t of Neonatology, Sisli Etfal Teaching and Research Hospital, Deniz Abdal Mah Hac, Zihni sok, Binnur Ap No: 35/D3, Istanbul 34280, Fatih, Turkey. E-mail: gunerkaratekin@yahoo.com ).

Written by Leisureguy

26 November 2007 at 7:51 am

Posted in Daily life, Health

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Vitamin D supplementation reduces mortality

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If you do a blog search on Vitamin D, you’ll see that assuring a good intake has all sorts of benefits. The problem is that most American adults who work indoors do not get enough Vitamin D. And in the winter, at higher latitudes (say, above San Francisco) you can’t get enough even outdoors: the winter sun is too weak. Here’s the latest:

In a review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials examining the impact of vitamin D supplementation on risk of dying from any health condition, supplementation with ordinary doses of vitamin D was found to be associated with reduced rates of total mortality. Eighteen independent, randomized, controlled trials involving a total of 57,311 subjects were identified through searches of PubMed, ISI Web of Science, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library for studies in any language. Supplementation with vitamin D (either vitamin D2 or D3) ranged in dosage from 300 to 2000 IU/day, depending on the study. The trial size-adjusted mean daily dose was 528 IU/d. A total of 4,777 deaths from any cause were found during a trial size-adjusted mean duration of 5.7 years. Significant differences in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D were found between the control and intervention groups in 9 of the studies (ranging from a 1.4- to a 5.2-fold difference). The summary relative risk for mortalit y from any cause was found to be 0.93. This risk did not change regardless of whether calcium supplements were taken or not. These results suggest that vitamin D supplementation in even ordinary doses may help to reduce the risk of mortality. The authors conclude, “Population-based, placebo-controlled randomized trials with total mortality as the main end point should be organized for confirming these findings.”

“Vitamin D supplementation and total mortality: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials” Autier P, Gandini S, Archives of Internal Medicine, 2007; 167(16): 1730-7. (Address: International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 cours Albert Thomas, F-69372 Lyon, France. E-mail: Philippe Autier, MD, autierp@iacr.fr ).

Written by Leisureguy

15 October 2007 at 8:38 am

Posted in Daily life, Health, Science

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Vitamin D for type 2 diabetics

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Interesting finding. I take 1400 IU of Vitamin D in supplements daily.

 In a study involving 462 consecutive type 2 diabetic patients with mild kidney dysfunction (mean age = 62 years), an independent association was observed between decreased serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations and prevalent cardiovascular disease (CVD). Kidney function was strongly and inversely associated with CVD. Using multivariate logistic regression analysis, an inverse association was observed between serum 25(OH)D concentrations and prevalent CVD (odds ratio = 0.95), independent of baseline kidney function and other known risk factors. Additionally, after adjusting for potential confounders, the inverse association between serum 25(OH)D concentrations and CVD remained statistically significant in patients in the lowest tertile for estimated glomerular filtration rate. Thus, the results of this study suggest that inadequate vitamin D status in type 2 diabetic patients with mild kidney dysfunction may be associated with prevalent CVD.

“Association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency and cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetic patients with mild kidney dysfunction,” Chonchol M, Cigolini M, Targher G, Nephrol Dial Transplant, 2007 Sep 17; [Epub ahead of print]. (Address: Michel Chonchol, MD, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Division of Renal Diseases and Hypertension; Box C-281, Denver, CO 80262, USA. Email: michel.chonchol@uchsc.edu ).

Written by Leisureguy

24 September 2007 at 7:45 am

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